NPPA Weighs In On Pivotal Copyright Case

Dec 19, 2013 Advocacy

DURHAM, NC (December 19, 2013) – The National Press Photographers Association has joined several other photographer and writer advocacy groups in filing legal documents urging a New York judge to find that an artist who used a photographer’s images in art exhibits without permission did so in violation of copyright law.

The decision in the case represents a test of a key legal doctrine, and will hopefully both clarify and place a reasonable limit on the “fair use” defense, which allows use of an otherwise copyrighted work for criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, or research.

In 2007 and 2008, artist Richard Prince altered and incorporated 30 of Patrick Cariou’s pictures into paintings and collages displayed in St. Barth’s and New York City. Cariou captured the images, which appeared originally in his Yes Rasta collection, over the course of six years living amongst Rastafarians in Jamaica. When Cariou discovered Prince’s work, he sued the artist for copyright infringement.

Read all the details and what's coming next here in NPPA's Advocacy Blog.