Photo Journal: David H. Wells

Jul 2, 2013

When we think about what elements constitute the “American Dream,” high on that list would be to own a house. There is nothing more personal, in both a physical and emotional sense, than the sanctuary of one’s home. After all, as Pliny the Elder (Caius Plinius Secundus) said in the first century, “Home is where the heart is.”

But what happens when that heart is ripped out of your chest? When everything you strived for in your life is taken away from you. The turmoil and emotional damage is unfathomable. According to several real estate tracking sources, there have been over 4 million completed foreclosures since the economic crash that started in September of 2008!

Several photographers have documented this American tragedy, but one photographer, David H. Wells turned it into a personal project that resulted in hauntingly beautiful yet terribly sad moments. He has turned the phrase “still life,” into exactly that, eerily still moments in life that exude ghost-like feelings among the remnants of the previous inhabitants. And he does so in the most unconventional of ways ... without showing any people!

In this installment of Photo Journal, Wells talks about being relentless in connecting with new audiences, the importance of long-term personal projects and why the ability to take pictures may be the least important thing in making a living in photography. Read it online here.