News Archive

Detrich Resigns Over Digitally Altered Page One Photo

By Donald R. Winslow

© 2007 News Photographer magazine

TOLEDO, OH – Veteran staff photographer Allan Detrich, who was suspended from work at The Toledo Blade while editors continued their investigation into his digitally altered page one photograph from last week, has resigned from the newspaper effective Saturday, April 7, the Blade announced today.

Meanwhile the investigation at the newspaper continues, regardless of Detrich's resignation, to see if there are more digitally altered photographs in their archives.

Asked today about the digitally manipulated photo after news of his resignation circulated, Detrich told News Photographer magazine that in retrospect, "It should never have been done. I apologize to everyone that I've hurt. I'm going to pursue things for myself now. I hope that the people that I've met and known over the years are still friends, no matter what happens, and I appreciate all the friendships that I've formed in the community and all the eMails that people have sent me."

On his blog Detrich wrote today that he has grown tired of the news business and that after 25 years of journalism it "just has not been fun anymore," and that he is "moving on to other things." The photographer told News Photographer magazine today that several weeks ago he formed a new company with some of his "storm-chaser friends," and that they intend to go into business offering a weather training course for first responders.

"He has not taken any photographs for the newspaper since his fact-finding meeting [with editors] last Thursday," Blade assistant managing editor for administration Luann Sharp said today. "All of his photos have been frozen in our archives pending further review by us." She said the photographer resigned in an eMail sent on Saturday.

Sharp told News Photographer magazine today, "As we explained to Allan on Friday, part of our review is to determine whether the transmission of an altered photo from the Bluffton baseball game was a 'simple mistake' or if there are other photos that were altered prior to publication. The investigation should be completed this week and we'll let readers know what we find. His resignation does not halt that investigation, as we need to be sure we are truthful with our readers."

Sharp said that in the aftermath of Detrich's altered photograph no new policies have been put into place at the paper, but that there will be a photography staff meeting on Tuesday "to reinforce our policy. We pay for our photographers and editors to belong to NPPA, so the expectations are quite clear. We'll walk them through it again, but we're pretty standard on 'crop it, caption it, send it' in terms of how we want our photographers to work." Sharp said there may or may not be changes in field practices for photographers based on their feedback during the upcoming meeting and on the outcome of the newspaper's experience with the Bluffton incident.

A page one photograph by Detrich last Saturday of the Bluffton University's baseball team kneeling in front of outfield banners created a controversy when a pair of legs clad in blue jeans that were visible behind one of the banners in other page one photographs in newspapers around the state were missing from the photograph published in the Blade. An investigation by Blade editors determined that the legs had been removed in Detrich's picture by digital manipulation prior to the picture being transmitted from Bluffton to the newspaper.

Detrich at first denied the alteration, telling News Photographer magazine that he didn't know what happened to the legs. Then later that same day when he met with editors he said that the photo's manipulation "was for his personal files," and that the wrong file was transmitted to the newspaper while he was on deadline "by mistake." He said that by doing the alteration he was trying to make "a beautiful photo," and that the altered picture was intended only for a print to be made for his office wall.

On Saturday the Associated Press in New York pulled all of Detrich's photographs from their archives. And some of Detrich's photographs, which were also available for purchase on printroom.com, were removed from that commercial Web site over the weekend as well.

The veteran photographer was scheduled to be off Friday and Saturday and return to work on Sunday, but Blade editors informed him on Friday that he was suspended for at least two days, with pay, starting on Sunday and continuing through Monday while their investigation continued.

When told of his suspension on Saturday, Detrich was also asked to turn in photography gear that was owned by the Blade, sources said.


Editors and Nate Parsons, the director of photography for the Blade, are now continuing their look back through all of Detrich’s previous work to see if other published photographs may have been digitally altered.

On Friday the Blade published this correction.

Detrich posted an entry on his personal blog after the incident and wrote about the altered photograph. He penned, “Yes. It was what it was, but I wanted it perfect, and maybe that is where I went wrong, trying to be perfect, in the end showed my flaws...”

The photographer is a native of Attica, OH, and attended the Ohio Institute of Photography in Dayton. Before that he worked for The Sunday Sun-Journal in Lewiston, ME; The Advertiser-Tribune in Tiffin, OH; the Daily Gazette in Xenia, OH; and The Kettering-Oakwood Times in Kettering, OH. He was also the Blade’s bureau photographer in Washington, DC, where he shot for Toledo and the Blade’s sister paper, The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, which are both owned by the Block News Alliance.

In 1998, Detrich was runner-up for the Pulitzer Prize in Feature photography for a five part series "Children of the Underground." It was an in-depth look at a covert underground organization that hides sexually abused children. Two times Detrich was the Ohio News Photographers Association Photographer of the Year (1991 and 1993), he won the Ohio clip contest Photographer of the Year title in 1994, and in 1991 he was the NPPA Region 4 Photographer of the Year.

A Web site called Bladevent.com, which promotes itself as a site that comments on Toledo's media and pop culture, has been following the Detrich story since Friday and has been getting a lot of attention online from members of the photojournalism community who've been discussing what's been posted there.

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Online Elections Open For Regions 2 & 6

DURHAM, NC - Online elections are now open for Regions 2 and 6 and NPPA members in good standing in those Regions may now vote for new Regional directors and associate directors, NPPA national secretary Sean D. Elliot has announced.

In Region 2 the candidates for director are Todd Maisel and Robert Stridiron, and the candidates for associate director are John Berry and Mark Dye.


In Region 6 the candidates for director are George McGinn and Bob Carey, and the candidates for associate director are Sam Cranston and Jim Michalowski.

Read the candidates biographies and statements here, and then vote here.

For more information, or if you have questions, write to [email protected].

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Linda Angelle Appointed Resolutions Chair

DURHAM, NC – NPPA national secretary Sean D. Elliot announced that NPPA past president Linda Angelle has been named as Resolutions Chair by current president Tony Overman.

Angelle will be responsible for gathering any resolutions that are to be submitted to the NPPA board of directors for consideration during their annual business meeting in May. She is assistant chief photographer for NBC5 in Fort Worth, TX and joined NPPA in 1985. She also has the distinction of being NPPA's first female television president.

According to NPPA's governing documents, any resolution to be considered must be submitted to the resolution chair at least 30-days prior to the annual meeting. Resolutions will then be distributed to the board at least 25-days prior to the meeting. Resolutions may be submitted to Angelle via eMail at [email protected].

NPPA’s bylaws state, “The only difference between bylaws amendments, standing rules amendments, and policies and procedures amendments, is the minimum vote requirements to pass an amendment. Two-thirds of the board must vote in favor to pass a bylaw change, while standing rules require a simple majority. Policies and procedures can be changed by a simple majority vote of either the board or the executive committee.

For more information or to ask questions, please contact Elliot at [email protected] or Angelle at [email protected].

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Detrich Suspended; AP Pulls His Photos From Archive

By Donald R. Winslow

 

© 2007 News Photographer magazine

 

TOLEDO, OH – Staff photographer Allan Detrich of The Toledo Blade has been suspended from work while editors continue to investigate his digitally altered page one news photograph from last week. The Associated Press in New York has pulled any of his photographs from their archives and Detrich's photographs, which were also available for purchase on printroom.com, have apparently also been removed from that commercial Web site.

 

Detrich claims that his alteration of last Saturday’s page one photograph of the Bluffton University baseball team kneeling in front of outfield banners “was for his personal files” and that the wrong file was transmitted to the newspaper while he was on deadline “by mistake.”

 

The veteran photographer was scheduled to be off Friday and Saturday and return to work on Sunday, but Blade editors informed him on Friday that he was suspended for at least two days, with pay, beginning Sunday and continuing through Monday as their investigation continues.

 

When told of his suspension Detrich was also asked to turn in photography gear that is owned by the Blade, sources said.

 

Editors and the director of photography at the Blade are now looking back through all of Detrich’s previous work to see if other published photographs have been digitally altered. Blade assistant managing editor for administration Luann Sharp said they’re looking to see if this was a “one time occurrence or if it has happened before.”

 

On Friday the Blade published this correction.

 

In Detrich’s altered photograph the legs of a photographer standing behind one of the outfield banners were removed from the image. His picture was altered to show only outfield grass and the fence. Photographs by other photographers who were shooting for large Ohio newspapers showed the blue jean legs standing or kneeling behind the banners. The similar photographs ran on many Ohio front pages on Saturday, the first papers published after the Friday event. Staff photographers in Dayton noticed the discrepancy on Saturday, and it quickly became a hot topic of discussion in the photojournalism community.

 

Detrich posted an entry on his personal blog after the incident and wrote about the altered photo. He wrote, “Yes. It was what it was, but I wanted it perfect, and maybe that is where I went wrong, trying to be perfect, in the end showed my flaws...”

 

The photographer is a native of Attica, OH, and attended the Ohio Institute of Photography in Dayton. Before that he worked for The Sunday Sun-Journal in Lewiston, ME; The Advertiser-Tribune in Tiffin, OH; the Daily Gazette in Xenia, OH; and The Kettering-Oakwood Times in Kettering, OH. He was also the Blade’s bureau photographer in Washington, DC, where he shot for Toledo and the Blade’s sister paper, The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, which are both owned by the Block News Alliance.

In 1998, Detrich was runner-up for the Pulitzer Prize in Feature photography for a five part series "Children of the Underground." It was an in-depth look at a covert underground organization that hides sexually abused children. Two times Detrich was the Ohio News Photographers Association Photographer of the Year (1991 and 1993), he won the Ohio clip contest Photographer of the Year title in 1994, and in 1991 he was the NPPA Region 4 Photographer of the Year.

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Ken Geiger Wins BOP's Magazine Picture Editor Of The Year

ATHENS, OH – Judges in the NPPA’s Best Of Photojournalism 2007 Picture Editing competition today released the last category of winners, the Magazine Picture Editor of the Year.

Ken Geiger of National Geographic magazine is the first place winner and the Magazine Picture Editor of the Year. Second place is MaryAnne Golon of Time magazine, and third place is Kurt Mutchler of National Geographic magazine. Honorable mentions were awarded to Kirk McKoy of the Los Angeles Times, and Robert Csere from Tyzden.

NPPA’s Best Of Photojournalism 2007 competition was sponsored again this year by Canon and Avid.

Ohio University has posted a video from the Best Of Photojournalism picture editing judging online. It was produced by Chad Stevens and can be seen here.

Earlier this week judges named Gail Fisher winner of the Newspaper Picture Editor of the Year/Individual category for work done when she was with the Los Angeles Times (she's since moved to National Geographic). Second place was Michael Hamtil of The Dallas Morning News, and third place was Brad Loper of The Dallas Morning News.

In other results, in the Newspaper Picture Editor of the Year/Team category, first place was the South Florida Sun-Sentinel and team members Tim Rasmussen, Rolando Otero, Taimy Alvarez, George Wilson, Sarah Orr, Meghan Lyden, and Mary Vignoloes. Second place was The Virginian-Pilot and team members David Hollingsworth, Norm Shafer, Martin Smith-Rodden, and Alex Burrows. And third place was the San Francisco Chronicle and team members Randy Greenwell, Mark Damon, Russell Yip, Dan Jung, Rick Romagosa, Jim Merithew, and Kathleen Hennssey. Honorable mentions were awarded to The Oregonian and team members Patty Reksten and Michael Davis, and to The Hartford Courant and team members Thomas McGuire, Sherry Peters, Elizabeth Bristow, Allison Corbett, David Grewe, Stephanie Heisler, and John Scanlan.

In the Best Use Of Photography for Newspapers with more than 75,000 circulation, first place was the Los Angeles Times, and second place was The New York Times.

In the Best Use Of Photography for Newspapers with less than 75,000 circulation, first place is The Concord Monitor. Second place is The Albuquerque Tribune, and third place is The Naples Daily News.

In the Best Use Of Photography for Magazines, first place is ZUMAPress for Doubletruck magazine. Second place is National Geographic, and third place is Sports Illustrated.

Complete results in all the Picture Editing categories are in a story here and many of the pages are displayed here.

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In Ohio, A News Photograph Is Digitally Altered

By Donald R. Winslow

© 2007 News Photographer magazine

TOLEDO, OH – New questions about news photo manipulation have come up after a high-profile Ohio sporting event that drew multiple photojournalists from large regional daily newspapers on Friday. When pictures by several photojournalists were published prominently on Saturday’s front pages, it was clear that one of the images differed significantly from the others, raising questions about whether the photograph had been digitally altered.

Late today one of the editors of the Toledo Blade confirmed what many had suspected, that a published picture by staff photographer Allan Detrich had indeed been digitally changed.

“The photograph was, in fact, altered,” Blade assistant managing editor for administration Luann Sharp told News Photographer magazine today. She issued a statement on behalf of the newspaper:

This allegation was brought to our attention by NPPA late Wednesday night. The Blade’s preliminary investigation confirms that the photo of the Bluffton baseball team published on page A-1 March 31, was digitally altered before it was submitted to the newspaper for publication. It was one of 16 photos turned in and it was the only one that was altered prior to being sent to the photo desk.

The photographer’s explanation is that he altered the photo for his personal files and inadvertently transmitted the wrong picture for publication. The Blade takes such matters very seriously and we are continuing our internal investigation. We also will notify our readers that an altered photograph was published.

Sharp said that at this time it appears that no one else at the Blade was involved in changing the image, and that no disciplinary action has been taken because the investigation is still ongoing. “We still have to examine discs, and to see what time files were sent it, so it is still ongoing,” she said.

Detrich's altered photograph was also published in the Cincinnati Enquirer and the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

* * * *

It’s a story that started last Friday and unfolded over the last few days as Ohio photojournalists talked about the difference between Detrich’s photograph and the images by other photographers from the same event.

In the right background of front page news photographs taken by other photojournalists working for three other newspapers, a pair of legs in blue jeans can be seen beneath a banner. But in Detrich’s photograph, the legs are not there. Only green grass.

Some wondered, did the person walk away for a moment, or were the pant legs digitally removed from the scene?

Earlier today Detrich told News Photographer magazine that he didn't know what happened to the legs, and offered no other explanation. Later in the day, after meeting with Blade editors and having his laptop examined, the photographer told a very different story.

* * * *

As it turns out, the mystery legs belong to Ohio freelance photojournalist Madalyn Ruggiero who was shooting Friday for the Chicago Tribune. “I was standing there the entire time,” Ruggiero told News Photographer magazine today. “I did not move away. I was kneeling, and then I was standing, but I was there. I did not leave.”

The controversy started after Friday’s event, when the surviving members of Bluffton University’s baseball team returned to the diamond for their first game since they were involved in a deadly bus accident on March 2. The accident on Interstate 75 in Atlanta killed five of their teammates.

Before the start of Friday’s game, the baseball team gathered in a circle on the playing field near five banners that were hanging on an outfield fence. The banners bore the names and uniform numbers of each one of their five deceased teammates. The Bluffton team members removed their caps and dropped to one knee as they observed a moment of silence or prayer, with the banners forming the right-hand background in an extremely horizontal composition.

Many photographers made pictures of the moment, but at least four photojournalists were shooting from a remarkably similar angle. Pictures from these four ran large (five or six columns wide) as Saturday’s lead art on the front page of their newspapers: The (Cleveland) Plain Dealer, the Dayton Daily News, The Lima News, and the Toledo Blade.

The photographers who had similar photographs published in a comparable and very prominent manner were Joshua Gunter of The Plain Dealer; Chris Stewart of the Dayton Daily News; Kelli Cardinal of The Lima News; and Detrich in the Blade.

On Monday, photographers at the Dayton Daily News noticed a discrepancy in the four front-page images. In Detrich’s photograph on the front of the Toledo Blade, the blue jean legs were missing.

“One of our staff photographers was poking around on a Web site on Monday that shows front pages,” Ron Rollins told News Photographer magazine today. He’s the managing editor for content for Cox Ohio Publishing, and he’s responsible for the sports, features, and photography departments at the Dayton Daily News. “It was a big story for Ohio and he wanted to see how various papers around the state handled it. It’s an odd situation to have nearly the same photo on several front pages on the same day, so he was poking around out of curiosity and he noticed what he thought he noticed, and it became a topic of conversation in the photo department.”

* * * *

As the week progressed, other photographers around Ohio were talking about the photograph as well. “I heard it was an AP photographer behind the banner,” Kelli Cardinal of The Lima News said, “because we were all wondering what the shot would have looked like from back there.”

Cardinal looked through her sequence of photographs from the event and said, “In a few of my photos, when they [the players] are starting to kneel down, the blue jean legs are also kneeling down, in the beginning. And then the person stood up, and they were there the whole time I was shooting. When the team was about to stand up, when the players were still kneeling but most of their heads are up and not down, and they’re almost standing up, the [blue jean] legs are still there.” Cardinal says that in every one of her photographs from the sequence, the blue jean legs are there behind the banner in some manner, either standing or kneeling.

As it turned out the legs were not those of an AP photographer, they were photographer Ruggiero’s legs.

Ohio freelancer J.D. Pooley was shooting the game for AP, and he’s the one who recognized the blue jean legs as those of Ruggiero, a freelancer based in the Toledo area who often shoots for the Detroit Free Press. Pooley transmitted a photograph on the AP wire of a groundskeeper raking the dirt around one of the bases with the banners in the background. It was taken about 10 minutes after the players quickly gathered, knelt down, and then dispersed. His picture clearly shows Ruggiero sitting on the ground behind the banners and looking out between two of them. Pooley’s picture of the scene ran large in The New York Times on Sunday.

Ruggiero is also certain that it was her legs behind the banner, as she was the only one in that position behind the fence. “I was there for the entire sequence, the only one there all by myself, I was standing there the entire time,” she told News Photographer magazine today.

Tribune editors told Ruggiero they wanted “something different.” “I was trying to get away from the pack of photographers, to get away and shoot something different, to get on the opposite side. I took a little walk, and then all of a sudden the players were coming up toward me. They were on their knees for a few quick moments, and I was kneeling at first and then I stood up and got about two frames. One was soft and the other one was sharp. It happened so fast, but I didn’t move away, I got two frames out of it. I was there the entire time. I was kneeling, then I stood up. I didn’t leave from there until the game was about to start.”

* * * *

Contacted early Thursday morning, five days after the pictures were published, Detrich told News Photographer magazine, “I don’t know what to say.” Asked this morning whether he had altered the photograph, he said that he had not – and that he didn’t know what could have happened to the image. When told that the photographer whose legs were visible behind the banner had been interviewed, and that she maintains that she did not leave that position, and that other photographers had examined their sequences of the event, and that the legs were visible for the entire time, he offered no response or explanation.

This morning Blade editors started an internal investigation into Detrich's photograph, and before noon they met with the photographer. They questioned Detrich about the image and the sequence of events and examined his laptop computer. Then Blade editors issued their statement saying the photograph had indeed been altered, and that their investigation continues.

Later in the day, after that meeting and the editors' statement, Detrich offered a different explanation, one that contradicts his statements of this morning. In an afternoon call to News Photographer magazine to “clarify some earlier points,” he now says that he made the altered photograph for himself and not for publication “I saw a beautiful picture and I made it for myself and I didn’t delete it from my ‘transmit’ folder. The altered photo and the original photo were in the transmit folder together. When it came time to transmit, the wrong picture was sent. It was a big mistake on my part.”

Detrich offered no explanation about why he was altering a photograph to make a personal print while on deadline with the newspaper and in the process of transmitting live images.

When asked why he was altering a news photograph in the first place, or making any changes at all in the image, Detrich said, “I was going to make a big print for myself. It wasn’t malicious. It just didn’t click on me. I’ve been covering this story for weeks. I didn’t even see Saturday’s newspaper, I went out of town Saturday afternoon.”

Asked why he didn't remember altering the photograph when asked about it this morning, but remembers it now after today's meeting with editors, Detrich said he didn't think of it this morning "while he was busy driving around."

* * * *

NPPA's Code of Ethics prohibits the digital manipulation of news photographs. “It is tempting to want to correct a flaw in an otherwise significant photograph, but whether it is done by photographer, editor, or lab tech, once a ‘moment’ has been captured on film or on digital media, we no longer have the right to change that image in any way except for minor dodging, burning, or cropping,” NPPA’s Ethics & Standards Committee chairperson John Long said today

“The legs in this photo are annoying, but they are there, in everyone’s frame, and ‘there’ is where they have to remain. Removing small details may be just a little lie, but the reading public does not make such distinctions. Big or small, significant or insignificant, a lie is a lie. And the public does not want to be lied to at all. Our credibility is all we have to offer the public and it must be protected. We cannot change the content of our photographs. We cannot lie.”

Detrich has been a staff photographer for the Toledo Blade since July 2000 where he shoots still photographs and develops multimedia projects for the Blade’s Web site. He’s been an NPPA member for more than two decades, and was NPPA’s Region 4 Photographer of the Year in 1991. Two times Detrich was the Ohio News Photographers Association Photographer of the Year (1991 and 1993), and he won the Ohio clip contest Photographer of the Year title in 1994.

Previously he was with the Blade’s bureau in Washington, DC, where he shot for Toledo and the Blade’s sister paper, The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, which are both owned by the Block News Alliance. Before that he worked for The Sunday Sun-Journal in Lewiston, ME; The Advertiser-Tribune in Tiffin, OH; the Daily Gazette in Xenia, OH; and The Kettering-Oakwood Times in Kettering, OH.

Update: On Friday, the Toledo Blade published this correction.

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Blogger Josh Wolf Released From Prison

SAN FRANCISCO, CA - Blogger and freelance journalist Josh Wolf, who has been held in federal prison for more than seven months for defying a grand jury subpoena to testify and turn over unaired video footage he shot of a G-8 summit protest rally turned violent in San Francisco in 2005, has been released from a jail in Dublin, CA, after reaching a deal Monday with prosecutors.

"Journalists absolutely have to remain independent of law enforcement. Otherwise, people will never trust journalists," Wolf told a reporter from The San Francisco Chronicle outside the prison gate after he walked out of the Federal Correctional Institution on Tuesday afternoon.

In a Chronicle photograph by Michael Maloney, Wolf can be seen leaving jail today escorted by two prison officials and followed by one of his lawyers, David Greene. Wolf is pushing a cart with his belongings, mostly books and letters, and is wearing a tee-shirt, shorts, and tennis shoes. Since last photographed when he returned to jail in September, Wolf has grown a long, black goatee.

Wolf's lawyers reached an agreement with a federal judge so that Wolf would not have to testify before a grand jury if he produced the video outtakes, and he would not have to identify people who are shown in his footage. The mediation to release Wolf had been going on for about six weeks, sources said.

Wolf posted the unaired videotape online on his Web site and gave it to the court to complete the agreement with the court, his lawyer said. Then U.S. District Judge William Alsup approved Wolf's release, which happened on Tuesday afternoon.

A statement from Wolf was posted on the Center for Media and Democracy Web site today. In it Wolf said, "It took 226 days, but it was worth every second to get what I wanted from day one, which is that I will not have to testify before the grand jury about the events at the protest or the identities of participants. The demand for my testimony before the grand jury was the true assault on my code of ethics and, as I have stated previously, there will be, and has been no compromise to this resolute principle."

The government's claim to Wolf's videotape has been that it was critical to their investigation of a protest that turned violent. The violence resulted in a San Francisco police officer's skull being fractured during a scuffle as protesters and unidentified marchers set tried to set fire to a police car. Because the police department receives federal funding, the arson is a potential felony. The videotape seen online on Wolf's Web site does not show anything of these events, his laywer told the media.

Wolf's lawyers told the San Francisco Chronicle that for the last few months the dispute between Wolf and the federal court has been about whether or not Wolf would have to testify, not about whether he would or would not turn over the video. In an earlier statement on his own blog Wolf said the discussion and his concern was not about the tape, but about whether he would be forced to testify before the grand jury. Once the court agreed that Wolf would not have to testify, a deal for his release was reached.

Wolf, 24, has been held in jail longer than any other American journalist for refusing to comply with a subpoena calling for him to testify and produce the tapes. Parts of his video had already been shown on TV after the 2005 political protest, and also shown on his Web site, but he refused to produce outtakes until now.

California's shield law protects journalists in state court, but there is no such law in federal court. The case involving Wolf's video is in federal court because of federal funding to the San Francisco police department, whose officers and vehicles were involved in the protest march Wolf photographed.

Press organizations had supported Wolf and used his case as an example for the need for a federal shield law for journalists, but prosecutors said Wolf was not a legitimate journalist.

Wolfwas at one time free on appeal but he was returned to prison in September 2006 when his bail was revoked after he lost the appeal.

On February 7, 2007, he set the dubious record of spending 169 days behind bars for contempt of court, more time in jail for the charge than any other journalist in recent history. Wolf has now been behind bars for more than 266 days.

Before Wolf, the honor of longest-jailed journalist was held by author Vanessa Leggett, who spent 168 days behind bars in the Federal Detention Center in Houston, TX, in 2001 for refusing to comply with a subpoena to turn over her notes, which included conversations with confidential sources, about a high-profile murder case she intended to write about. Leggett claimed a reporter’s privilege under the U.S. Constitution in court when ordered to produce her notes and was found in contempt.

Media organizations and lawyers have taken different sides, at different times, about whether Wolf has a rightful claim to be called a "journalist" or whether he is a political activist and Web blogger.

In August 2006 after Wolf was originally jailed, National Press Photographers Association president Tony Overman led a press conference along with leaders of other journalism organizations in San Francisco to protest Wolf's jailing and voice disapproval of recent court rulings that pressured journalists to release information to the government. The press groups called for the development of a federal shield law to protect journalists in situations like the ones created by Wolf's actions.

The Web site nwzchick reported today that an impromptu celebration party was being planned for Wolf tonight at San Francisco's House of Shields.

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Fisher, McNally, McKoy In Top BOP Picture Editing Winners

 

ATHENS, OH – Judges in the NPPA’s Best Of Photojournalism 2007 Picture Editing competition today released the names of the contest’s winners. The categories were judged at the editing contest's host site at Ohio University’s School of Visual Communication (VisCom) in Athens from Thursday, March 28 through Saturday, March 30.

NPPA’s Best Of Photojournalism 2007 competition was sponsored again this year by Canon and Avid.

Ohio University has posted a video from the Best Of Photojournalism picture editing judging online. It was produced by Chad Stevens and can be seen here.

* * * *

Gail Fisher is the winner of the Newspaper Picture Editor of the Year/Individual category for work done when she was with the Los Angeles Times (she's since moved to National Geographic). Second place is Michael Hamtil of The Dallas Morning News, and third place is Brad Loper of The Dallas Morning News.

In the Newspaper Picture Editor of the Year/Team category, first place is the South Florida Sun-Sentinel and team members Tim Rasmussen, Rolando Otero, Taimy Alvarez, George Wilson, Sarah Orr, Meghan Lyden, and Mary Vignoloes. Second place is The Virginian-Pilot and team members David Hollingsworth, Norm Shafer, Martin Smith-Rodden, and Alex Burrows. And third place is the San Francisco Chronicle and team members Randy Greenwell, Mark Damon, Russell Yip, Dan Jung, Rick Romagosa, Jim Merithew, and Kathleen Hennssey. Honorable mentions were awarded to The Oregonian and team members Patty Reksten and Michael Davis, and to The Hartford Courant and team members Thomas McGuire, Sherry Peters, Elizabeth Bristow, Allison Corbett, David Grewe, Stephanie Heisler, and John Scanlan.

In the Best Use Of Photography for Newspapers with more than 75,000 circulation, first place is the Los Angeles Times, and second place is The New York Times.

In the Best Use Of Photography for Newspapers with less than 75,000 circulation, first place is The Concord Monitor. Second place is The Albuquerque Tribune, and third place is The Naples Daily News.

In the Best Use Of Photography for Magazines, first place is ZUMAPress for Doubletruck magazine. Second place is National Geographic, and third place is Sports Illustrated.

 

* * * *

 

In the newspaper picture editing categories, Michele McNally of The New York Times swept the Single Page News category for the top three spots of first, second, and third places. Honorable mentions were awarded to Cindy Smith and Brad Loper of The Dallas Morning News (for two entries); Liz Wishaw and Brad Loper of The Dallas Morning News; and Barbara Davidson, Cindy Smith, William D. Snyder, and Michael Hamtil of The Dallas Morning News.

In the Newspaper Front Page category, first place is Mark Edelson, Greg Lovett, Pete Cross, Sabrina Starrett, Bill Rose, and Tim Burke of The Palm Beach Post. Second is Michael Davis and Patty Reksten of The Oregonian, and third place is Randall Moore of The Globe and Mail. Honorable mentions were awarded to Alex Burrows, Ryan Healy, and Genevieve Ross of The Virginian-Pilot; Michelle McNally of The New York Times (for two entries); David Grewe, Greg Harmel, Thom McGuire, and John Scanlan of The Hartford Courant; and Rob Romig and Thomas Boyd of The Sunday Register.

In the Newspaper News Section Front (Other Than Front Page) category, first place is Mark Edelson, Gary Coronado, and Em Mendez of The Palm Beach Post. Second place is Bruce Moyer and Melaine Shaffer of NE magazine in The Hartford Courant, and third place is Brian Kerrigan of The Globe and Mail. Honorable mentions were awarded to Kathleen Hennessy, Randy Greenwell, Mark Damon, Russell Yip, Dan Jung, Rick Romagosa, and Jim Merithew of the San Francisco Chronicle; Michael Hamti, Lisa Veigel, and Bruce Tomaso of The Dallas Morning News; Michele McNally of The New York Times; and Alex Burrows and Chris Curry of The Virginian-Pilot.

In the Newspaper Sports category, first place is Patty Reksten and Michael Davis of The Oregonian. Second place is Craig Fritz and Mark Holm of the Albuquerque Tribune, and third place is Bob Mayer, Jon Boho, and Amy Beth Bennett of the South Florida Sun-Sentinel. Honorable mentions were awarded to Craig Fritz and Mark Holm of the Albuquerque Tribune (for two entries), and to Anne-marie McReynolds and Elly Oxman of The San Jose Mercury News.

In the Newspaper Sports Project category, first place is Jay Quadracci of the Rocky Mountain News. Second place is Dan Habib of the Sunday Monitor, and third place is Cindy Smith and Brad Loper of The Dallas Morning News. Honorable mentions were awarded to Kirk McKoy, Iris Schneider, and Mary Cooney of the Los Angeles Times, and Craig Fritz, Wendi Wilkerson, and Mark Holm of The Albuquerque Tribune.

In the Newspaper Documentary Photojournalism Project (Single Page) category, first place is Elly Oxman of the San Jose Mercury News. Second place is Melaine Shaffer and Bruce Moyer for an entry from NE Magazine, and third place is Suzette Moyer and Scott DeMuesy from the St. Petersburg Times. Honorable mentions were awarded to Robert St. John, Kelli Sullivan, and Mary Cooney of the Los Angeles Times; Michael Whitley, Carolyn Cole, and Mary Cooney of the Los Angeles Times; and Kelli Sullivan, Francine Orr, and Marry Cooney of the Los Angles Times.

In the Newspaper Documentary Photojournalism Project (Multiple Page) category, first place is Tim Rasmussen, Mike Stocker, Joe Amon, Chris Mihal, Rebekah Monson, and Mary Vignoles of the South Florida Sun-Sentinel. Second place is Mark Morris, Renee C. Beyer, and Sue Morrow from The Sacramento Bee, and third place is Mark Morris, Manny Crisostomo, Time Reese, and Sue Morrow of The Sacramento Bee. Honorable mentions were awarded to Barry Gutierrez and Sonya Doctorian of The Rocky Mountain News; Geri Migielicz and Elly Oxman of the San Jose Mercury News; Anja Schlein, Cindy Smith, and Lara Solt of The Dallas Morning News; and Fred Nelson of The Seattle Times.

In the Newspaper Illustrative Project (Single Page) category, first place is Tom Fox, Mary Jennings, Mike Merschel, and Michael Hamtil of The Dallas Morning News. Second place is Mark Mirko, Tim Reck, and Elizabeth Bristow of The Hartford Courant, and third place is Brian Harkin, Mary Jennings, Mike Merschel, and Michael Hamtil of The Hartford Courant. Honorable mentions were awarded to Roger Hallett of The Globe and Mail (for two entries), and to Kye R. Lee, Mary Jennings, Mike Merschel, and Michael Hamtil of The Dallas Morning News.

In the Newspaper Illustrative Project (Multiple Page) category, first place is David Hollingsworth, Steve Earley, Ryan Healy, and Alex Burrows of The Virginian-Pilot. Second place is Lance Murphey and John Sale of The Commercial Appeal, and third place is Kirk McKoy of the Los Angeles Times. Honorable mentions were awarded to Alan Spearman and John Sale of The Commercial Appeal, and to Fred Nelson of The Seattle Times.

In the Newspaper Special Section or Reprint category, first place is Fred Nelson of The Seattle Times. Second place is Cindy Hively, Kelli Sullivan, and Mary Cooney of the Los Angeles Times, and third place is The Roanoke Times. An honorable mention was awarded to Jami C. Smith, Geri Migielicz, and Elly Oxman of the San Jose Mercury News.

In the Newspaper Recurring Feature or Series category, first place is Robert St. John, Cindy Hively, Iris Schneider, Hal Wells, and Mary Cooney of the Los Angeles Times. Second place is Michele McNally of The New York Times, and third place is Elly Oxman of the San Jose Mercury News. Honorable mentions were awarded to Mark Holm of The Albuquerque Tribune, and Rob Witzel, Rob mack, and Brian Kratzer of The Gainsville Sun.

In the Newspaper Multi-Page News category, first place is Dean Krakel, Mark Osler, and Janet Reeves of the Rocky Mountain News. Second place is Michele McNally of The New York Times, and third place is Jeff McAdory, Jim Weber, and John Sale of The Commercial Appeal. Honorable mentions were awarded to Dean Krakel, Mark Osler, and Reeves of the Rocky Mountain News, and to Cindy Smith and Brad Loper of The Dallas Morning News.

 
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In the magazine picture editing categories, Kirk McKoy of the Los Angeles Times swept the Magazine Cover category winning first, second, and third places. Honorable mentions were awarded to Tom Reese and Carol Nakagawa of Pacific Northwest magazine, and to National Geographic.

In the Magazine News Story category, first place is Michele Stephenson, Crary Pullen, and MaryAnne Golon of Time magazine. Second place is National Geographic magazine, and third place is Michele Stephenson and MaryAnne Golon. Honorable mentions were awarded to National Geographic magazine (for three entries), and to MaryAnne Golon.

In the Magazine Story Opener category, first place is Ken Geiger from National Geographic magazine. Second place is Michele Stephenson and MaryAnne Golon from Time magazine, and third place is Kirk McKoy from the Los Angeles Times. Honorable mentions were awarded to McKoy; Amy Pereira-Frears and Simon Barnett from Newsweek; Michele Stephenson, Hillary Raskin, and MaryAnne Golon from Time; Alan Berner and Carol Nakagawa from The Seattle Times; Vladimira Pcolova and Robert Csere from Tyzden; and National Geographic magazine.

In the Magazine Illustrative Story category, first and second place goes to National Geographic magazine. Third place is Vladimira Pcolova, Martin Kollar, and Robert Csere of Tyzden. Honorable mentions were awarded to National Geographic magazine; Simon Barnett of Newsweek; Jennifer Beeson, J. Porter, Mark Peterson, Michael Bolden, Leslie Garcia, and Evan Kriss of Washington Post Magazine; and to Kirk McKoy of the Los Angeles Times.

In the Magazine Sports Feature Story category, first place is Jim Colton of Sports Illustrated. Second place is Steve Fine of Sports Illustrated, and third place is Miriam Marseu of Sports Illustrated. An honorable mention was also awarded to Steve Fine.

In the Magazine Recurring Feature or Series category, first place is National Geographic magazine. Second place is Jim Colton of Sports Illustrated, and third place is Barry Wong and Carol Nakagawa of The Seattle Times. An honorable mention was also awarded to Jim Colton.

In the Magazine Personality Profile of Lifestyle Story category, first place is National Geographic magazine. Second place is Michele Stephenson, Hillary Raskin, and MaryAnne Golon from Time magazine, and third place is Alan Berner and Carol Nakagawa from The Seattle Times. Honorable mentions were awarded to Vladimira Pcolova and Robert Csere from Tyzden, and Michele Stephenson and Andrea Ferronato from Time magazine.

 
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Best Of Photojournalism 2007 Picture Editing division judging at Ohio University was done under the direction of BOP committee members Terry Eiler and Stan Alost. Eiler is the director of OU’s School of Visual Communication (VisCom) and Alost is a VisCom associate professor.

Judges for the Picture Editing division of this year’s Best Of Photojournalism 2007 contest were Elizabeth Cheng Krist, an illustrations editor for National Geographic magazine; Pulitzer Prize-winning photojournalist William D. Snyder, the former director of photography for The Dallas Morning News; John Glenn, an editor for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution; Bonnie Jo Mount, an assistant professor at Hampton University in Hampton, VA; and freelance photojournalist Bob Sacha of New York City, a Knight Fellow at Ohio University, who is serving as an alternative judge.

In addition to Canon and Avid, NPPA’s Best Of Photojournalism 2007 competition is also sponsored by The Poynter Institute for Media Studies in St. Petersburg, FL; Hesketh.com; Ibiblio.org; Camera Bits; Think Tank Photo; and MerlinOne.

For more information or to ask questions please contact Best Of Photojournalism 2007 contest coordinator Thomas Kenniff at [email protected].

 

Read an earlier story about the picture editing contest and judging.

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Best Of Photojournalism Judges Make Tough Choices at Ohio University

By Greg Smith

ATHENS, OH – Judging for NPPA’s Best of Photojournalism 2007 Picture Editing division proceeded steadily today in a crowded conference room of Ohio University’s new John Calhoun Baker Student Center.

Stan AlostBy late afternoon, a half-dozen categories had been reviewed, with students sitting beside judges to offer technical assistance. Most observers agreed this second competition featuring electronic Acrobat .PDF files, rather than printed news pages, drew strong entries. And there were few technical glitches.

NPPA’s Best Of Photojournalism 2007 competition is sponsored this year by Canon and Avid.

“There’s so much strong content, that it’s difficult to get down to the final five or six edits,” explained John Glenn, one of the NPPA judges and an associate editor for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. “They’re all good, but there are different degrees of good.”

Fellow judge Bonnie Jo Mount, an assistant professor at Hampton University, noted the collaboration involved in making the entries shine. “I’m really impressed,” she said. “So far all the categories seem consistently strong.”

Judging of the Best Of Photojournalism 2007 Picture Editing division runs from March 29 through March 31 at Ohio University, the editing division’s host site and a returning contest sponsor, under the coordination of BOP committee members Terry Eiler and Stan Alost. Eiler is the director of OU’s School of Visual Communication (VisCom), and Alost is a VisCom associate professor.

Other judges for the Picture Editing division of this year’s Best Of Photojournalism contest include Elizabeth Cheng Krist, a illustrations editor for National Geographic magazine; Pulitzer Prize-winning photojournalist William D. Snyder, the former director of photography for The Dallas Morning News; and freelance photojournalist Bob Sacha of New York City, a Knight Fellow at Ohio University, who is serving as an alternative judge.

In addition to Canon and Avid, NPPA’s Best Of Photojournalism 2007 competition is also sponsored by The Poynter Institute for Media Studies in St. Petersburg, FL; Hesketh.com; Ibiblio.org; Camera Bits; Think Tank Photo; and MerlinOne.

For more information or to ask questions please contact Best Of Photojournalism 2007 contest coordinator Thomas Kenniff at [email protected].

 

Read an earlier story about last week's Still Photography judging.

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NFL Owners Change Sideline TV Photographer Ban

DURHAM, NC – Owners of the 32 National Football League teams voted in Phoenix on Monday to change their 2006 unanimous vote that banned local television affiliates from NFL sidelines during the games last season, forcing them to take a network pool feed or video from the NFL itself for use in their news and sports reports. This year team owners changed course and voted to allow up to 10 video crews to cover games from the field, five from the local market of each competing team.

“We are going to expand the pool feed system that we had last year to 5 local TV stations per team (10 total)," NFL spokesman Greg Aiello told Advocacy Committee chairperson and NPPA's past president Alicia Wagner Calzada today. “It will continue to be a pool feed.” The footage will continue to be available to other stations that are credentialed for the game.

About last year's sidelines ban for local TV affiliates Aiello said, “We certainly recognized that the stations were not pleased, and we said that we would review the policy and modify it if we thought that it made sense. And that’s what we have done. We’ve always valued the coverage of the local stations and we continue to value it. We think these changes will improve the system and make it more efficient."

NFL owners were having their annual meeting, this year in Phoenix, AZ, when the NFL's broadcast committee reviewed last year's decision, Aiello said. The suggested change for this year was presented to the clubs and they accepted it. Aiello said that the changes were not an individual resolution like last year's ban, but instead was part of a bigger resolution relating to various broadcast issues that was passed when owners voted on Monday.

"This is a victory, but it's important to note that this does not take us back to where we were before the previous decision," Calzada said today from San Antonio, TX. "It is still limited, but it's better than it was before. With all of the entities trying to impose greater restrictions on photographers, it is so encouraging to see the NFL take this step. There is great value in the local television coverage of these teams and it would appear that they have recognized that. This is not just a win for the photographers and the stations, but it is a win for our viewers and for fans. They will be able to get better coverage of their teams and better stories. As journalists, we just want the ability to tell stories in the best way possible.

"The NPPA has fought hard against these restrictions since the day they were announced last year. This shows how important it is to push back when unreasonable restrictions are placed on access. The NFL, which is a private entity, could have tried to kept their restrictions as is, but there was enormous outcry from journalists, stations, and even lawmakers. We are thankful to hear that the owners have responded to these complaints," Calzada said.

Television news directors and press freedom organizations opposed the 2006 decision by team owners, saying that it severely restricted their ability to report on teams and to cover games. Politicians got involved, and legislation that would assure access to games in publicly funded stadiums was introduced in state legislatures in Michigan, Missouri, and Arizona.

"I am very proud of NPPA's Advocacy Committee - particularly Alicia and [attorney] Mickey Osterreicher - for the work they have done from the very beginning to make the NFL aware of our concerns with the local television access restrictions, and to reach a reasonable resolution," NPPA president Tony Overman said today. "The committee's successful efforts across the country each year have helped all journalists, not just NPPA members, retain their rights to First Amendment access."

In April 2006 Calzada, who was then NPPA's president, sent a letter to National Football League commissioner Paul Tagliabue, as well as to the 32 NFL team owners and each team’s public relations director, expressing NPPA’s “extreme disappointment” in the NFL owners’ unanimous vote ban local affiliate television photojournalists from sidelines during games. “We believe this decision is extremely short-sighted,” Calzada wrote on behalf of NPPA. “We call for the NFL and the league’s individual teams to reverse this destructive decision. We further propose that you work with industry groups like NPPA to create a solution that balances the needs and concerns of the NFL with the needs of the local media to properly cover your teams.”

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