News Archive

NPPA's 2006 Best Of Photojournalism: Ready To Pick Winners

DURHAM, NC – All of the entries are in and categorized, the judges are standing by, and the winners are just waiting to be picked in NPPA's 2006 Best Of Photojournalism contest, the largest BOP competition to date. Photographers entered more than 55,000 still images in this year's competition and by this time they have finished using NPPA's online contest portal to make any final adjustments to their entries and captions. The next step in the NPPA's fifth annual contest is for the judging to begin.

"This year the 55,000 still photographs entered in the Best Of Photojournalism contest is a 45% growth in the size of the contest over last year," NPPA BOP contest coordinator Thomas Kenniff said. Keith Jenkins, BOP coordinator for the contest's Web division and deputy assistant managing editor for photography at The Washington Post, reports the number of Web entries in this year's contest has more than doubled since 2005. Entries in the BOP's picture editing and television divisions are still being counted.

Entries in the Best Of Photojournalism contest have increased from 23,000 still photographs taken in 2001 and judged in 2002, to more than 38,999 still photographs taken in 2004 and judged in 2005, to this year's more than 55,000 photographs taken in 2005 and judged this Spring.

Electronic judging of the Best Of Photojournalism in the still photography categories begins Sunday, March 19, at The Poynter Institute for Media Studies in St. Petersburg, FL. NPPA executive director Greg Garneau will be there to report results and assist with the proceedings along with contest coordinator Kenniff and Jared Haworth, NPPA's Web site administrator. Judging of the Web categories will also take place at Poynter during the still photography judging, but with different judges.

This year's still photography judges are: Ramiro Fernandez, photography editor for People magazine; Christine McNeal, deputy managing editor for design, graphics, and photography for The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel; Ricardo Ferro, director of photography for Efeamerica; Ruth Fremson, a staff photojournalist for The New York Times; and James Colton, photography editor for Sports Illustrated magazine.

This year's Web division judges are: Margarita Corporan, a senior photography editor for America Online; Andrew DeVigal, an assistant professor at San Francisco State University and co-principal of Devigal Design; 2005 Pulitzer Prize-winning photojournalist Deanna Fitzmaurice, a staff photojournalist for the San Francisco Chronicle; and Juan Thomassie, a senior designer for USAToday.com.

Judging in the BOP's editing categories begins April 3 at the Ohio University School of Visual Communication in Athens, OH, coordinated by VisCom's director, Terry Eiler. Judges for the editing categories, where there are 1,600 magazine entries from the States and abroad, are: Nancy Andrews, director of photography for the Detroit Free Press; Bert Fox, a photography editor for National Geographic; Boyzell Hosey, director of photography for the St. Petersburg Times; and Peter Howe, a photography editor and author who is the former director of photography for Life and the former picture editor of The New York Times Sunday Magazine.

Judging in the BOP television categories begins March 4 at Poynter and runs and runs through March 10, coordinated by Merry Murray of KSNW-TV in Wichita, KS, and Michael Harrity of KUSA-TV 9News in Denver, CO. Judges for the television categories are already picked, but their names will not be revealed until judging is underway.

NPPA's Best Of Photojournalism contest is sponsored by Canon, Avid, The Poynter Institute for Media Studies, Hesketh.com, Ibiblio.org, Western Kentucky University, Camera Bits, Ohio University, and Merlin One.

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NPPA Objects To "Orphan Works" Copyright Proposal

DURHAM, NC – Alicia Wagner Calzada, president of the National Press Photographers Association, said today that the NPPA "views with concern proposals being discussed by U.S. lawmakers that would undermine legal options for protecting copyrights, changes that were proposed in an Orphan Works report issued recently by the U.S. Copyright Office."

The Orphan Works law proposed by the U.S. Copyright Office would change the Copyright Act so that someone who wants to use a copyrighted work, but is unable to find the copyright owner after a "reasonable search," could use it without fear of paying damages. Under the current law someone who uses a copyrighted work without first obtaining permission is liable for damages even if they tried but could not locate the copyright owner.

Even though the proposed Orphan Works legislation is still in the early stages, Calzada urges NPPA members to act now and to write to Senators and Representatives immediately to voice a strong objection.

"Proposals in the Orphan Works report would make it easier for people to use your images without your permission, and make it harder for you to collect the money you're owed when they do," Calzada said. "This should concern photojournalists, because many published images are copied and recopied without permission. If credits are removed in this process, making it difficult to identify the copyright holder, the image could be considered 'orphaned.'"

NPPA is among a growing list of organizations representing photographers and other visual artists in calling for their members to speak out against the proposed Orphan Works legislation.

A sample letter of objection is part of a Web resource page that's been prepared by the American Society of Media Photographers as part of the effort to defeat the Orphan Works legislation. The resource page explains many of the problems accompanying the legislation. It includes links to the Copyright Office's report, fax numbers for all of the Judiciary Committee members, suggestions to help speed drafting your own letter of objection, a sample letter, and tools for finding contact information for Senators and Representatives.

ASMP general counsel Victor S. Perlman, writing about what's wrong with the Orphan Works legislation, said, "The bottom line is that, even if you have done everything right, including registering your photographs immediately at the Copyright Office, every photograph that you publish may be up for grabs if it doesn't have a published credit. Yes, people have to contact publishers to try to identify and locate you, but if that doesn't produce your name and/or contact information for any reason, they may be entitled to a free, or almost free, pass."

On February 23 the annual American Bar Association Intellectual Property Section Update was presented by the U.S. Copyright Office and ASMP executive director Eugene Mopsik attended. Mopsik reports that Jule Sigall, associate register for policy and international affairs for the U.S. Copyright Office, who is also the principal author of the Orphan Works report, was in attendance along with other top officials, and an overview of the Copyright Office's activities from the preceding year was given.

"There was much discussion of Orphan Works and the various assumptions made that led to the current recommendations," Mopsik wrote. "It is ASMP's conclusion that the current report and recommendations have accommodated the needs of the library, museum, and university communities, in addition to commercial users, while ignoring the special needs of photographers, graphic artists, and illustrators.

"While historically there has been a sensitivity to the needs of creators within the Copyright Office, this report signals a shift and reveals a lack of understanding of the particular workings of the commercial art and photography marketplace. It further reveals pressures being brought to bear by those who find copyright an outdated and restrictive covenant."

Mopsik concluded, "There is still an opportunity to exert influence and try to improve this proposal before it becomes the law of the land. Be sure to write to your elected representatives!"

Other organizations joining in the opposition of the Orphan Works proposal include the Graphic Artists Guild, the Stock Artists Alliance, Advertising Photographers of America, Editorial Photographers, the Picture Archive Council of America, and the Illustrators Partnership of America (which carries with it approximately 40 other organizations). Tonight, overseas organizations including the Association of Photographers Ltd. (AOP), the British Association of Picture Libraries and Agencies (BAPLA), the British Institute of Professional Photography, and other imaging groups from the U.K. have added their support to the opposition.

"Please contact your congressional representatives on this issue," Calzada repeated today. "The protection of copyright is critical to the future of our industry."

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AP and LPGA Reach Credential Agreement For Fields Open

 The Associated Press announced today in New York that they have reached an agreement with the Ladies Professional Golf Association on "significant issues" in a dispute about media credentials that arose over coverage of the LPGA Fields Open golf tournament this week in Kapolei, Hawaii.

AP had been refused credentials to cover the tournament when they would not sign a credential agreement that contained new restrictions on use of its stories and photographs. On Thursday the National Press Photographers Association voiced support for AP’s refusal to agree to the LPGA’s new credential requirements, and Hawaii's two largest daily newspapers also refused to cover the golf match in support of AP's stance and in objection to the credential's terms.

AP says today's agreement enables them to provide full coverage of the Fields Open tournament this weekend while still continuing to disagree with parts of the new requirements. The discussions with the LPGA over future media credential requirements will continue, AP says. One of the new restrictions AP had objected to is that photographers, by signing the credential form, were agreeing that the LPGA had an unlimited, perpetual right to use their photographs for free. AP, backed by several other news organizations, refused to agree with the terms required by the credential consent form and, as a result, said they would not cover this weekend's tournament.

Today in a joint statement the AP and LPGA said they had resolved "the most significant issues." "The LPGA has always intended for its credentials to provide media companies with the same rights to use news and information obtained at LPGA events that are available from other mainstream sports leagues and governing bodies," the statement said.

"AP is satisfied with assurances from LPGA that its regulations were never intended to and don't limit access or editorial use of information and photos obtained at their events," it said. As part of the agreement, the LPGA will include a provision in its future credential regulations that permit media outlets to make unrestricted editorial use of any images or articles they create as part of their access to LPGA events.

AP did not have reporters or photographers covering the first round of play in Kapolei on Thursday, while some foreign golf journalists and television organizations who had already signed the credential agreement continued to cover the first day of play.

Still unresolved after today's joint statement and agreement is an LPGA provision that gives the association broad rights to make promotional use of stories and photographs produced by journalists who are covering LPGA events. AP's story today quotes AP's assistant general counsel, Dave Tomlin, as saying, "We're still discussing that with LPGA. In the meantime, they've said that the provision is optional for the Fields, and we've opted out." Apparently AP journalists were allowed to "cross out" offending sections of the credential agreement this one time, for the Fields Open, while credential discussions continue between the LPGA and news organizations.

On Thursday, the presidents of the AP Managing Editors, AP Sports Editors, and AP Photo Managers associations - representing 1,800 newspapers who are members of the AP in the United States and The Canadian Press in Canada - sent a letter to the LPGA in support of the AP's decision. The National Press Photographers Association also voiced support. Honolulu's two daily newspapers - both sponsors of the tournament - also pulled their coverage after their reporters and photographers refused to sign the LPGA's coverage agreement.

In a wire bulletin on Wednesday, AP informed its members that it would not provide photographic coverage of the LPGA tournament this weekend. AP sent members this advisory: "Photo Editors and Sports Editors - Due to restrictions on photo usage imposed when signing the Ladies Professional Golf Association (LPGA) photo credential application, The Associated Press will not be able to provide photo coverage from this weekend's golf tournament in Hawaii. We are in discussions with the LGPA and will advise if the situation changes. The AP."

In an AP story about the credential dispute, AP sports editor Terry Taylor said, "Any stories and photos produced by AP staffers belong to AP. We cannot accept this attempt by the LPGA to put such severe limits on AP's editorial use of its own work, and we can't accept any demand that AP provide free use of its material as a condition for being allowed to cover an event."

See yesterday's story here.

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NPPA Supports AP's Decision To Dispute LPGA Golf Credentials

 The Associated Press is reporting from Kapolei, Hawaii, that they have been refused credentials to cover the Ladies Professional Golf Association Fields Open golf tournament in an ongoing dispute over new credential restrictions on use of its stories and photographs. This morning the National Press Photographers Association voiced support for AP’s refusal to agree to the LPGA’s new credential requirements.

AP says that reporter Jaymes Song and photographer Ronen Zilberman (an NPPA member since 1998) were not allowed on the course to cover practice rounds or access to the media room after refusing to sign an LPGA credential form that contained new restrictions. One of the restrictions AP objects to is that photographers, by signing the form, agree that the LPGA has an unlimited, perpetual right to use their photographs for free.

AP has refused to agree with the terms required by the credential consent form and, as a result, will not be covering the tournament. NPPA supports the decision by AP and any other media organization that decides to not cover the event due to the credential requirements, NPPA’s president said today.

“The National Press Photographers Association fully supports the decision of the Associated Press and any other media outlets that refuse to cover the upcoming Fields Open LPGA tournament in Hawaii due to the onerous credential terms the LPGA has presented as a condition for coverage,” NPPA president Alicia Wagner Calzada said.

The Honolulu Star-Bulletin has also refused to sign the credential form because of the new restrictions, and told its readers in today's newspaper that they would not cover the tournament because of the LPGA's new policies. "The LPGA would require us to let them use our photos forever, for free," said Star-Bulletin editor Frank Bridgewater in today's edition, "and we would have to ask its permission if we wanted to use our own photos in the future."

Bridgewater also said that under the terms of the new credential agreement, the LPGA would be able to use the paper's stories at no charge forever, and would force the paper to gather all releases needed - covering such areas as copyrights, trademarks, right of publicity and right of privacy - whenever the LPGA chose to use Star-Bulletin material. "We will not sign a form that places limits on how we can use our own photos, or that allow others to have any control over our stories," the newspaper reports Bridgewater saying.

NPPA's Calzada said, “It is extremely unreasonable and unprofessional for any event organizer, sports or otherwise, to claim rights to images taken by media organizations covering that event. Journalists must not be bullied into turning over their rights as a condition of coverage. Furthermore, it is inappropriate for the LPGA to attempt to gain usage of photographs that they did not pay for. The restrictions on future uses are also unacceptable for a news organization and would severely limit the ability to properly cover the sport on an ongoing basis."

“If the terms are not changed to represent an appropriate agreement between event organizers and those who cover it, we encourage other news organizations to join those who have already refused to cover this event.” Several local news organizations and TV stations have apparently signed the agreement and are continuing to cover the tournament.

In a wire bulletin on Wednesday, AP informed its members that it would not provide photographic coverage of the LPGA tournament this weekend. AP sent members this advisory: "Photo Editors and Sports Editors - Due to restrictions on photo usage imposed when signing the Ladies Professional Golf Association (LPGA) photo credential application, The Associated Press will not be able to provide photo coverage from this weekend's golf tournament in Hawaii. We are in discussions with the LGPA and will advise if the situation changes. The AP."

In an AP story about the credential dispute, AP sports editor Terry Taylor said, "Any stories and photos produced by AP staffers belong to AP. We cannot accept this attempt by the LPGA to put such severe limits on AP's editorial use of its own work, and we can't accept any demand that AP provide free use of its material as a condition for being allowed to cover an event."

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UNC Bootcamp Teaches Multimedia Storytelling Skills

 

Rich Beckman, University of North Carolina at Chapel HillDURHAM, NC – Rich Beckman, a professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the school's director of visual communication, has announced that the fifth annual Multimedia Bootcamp Workshop at UNC-CH will be held May 6 through 12, 2006.

“The workshop is designed for working visual journalists who are interested in exploring multimedia storytelling,” Beckman said. The skills being taught are the talents that photojournalists of the future will need in order to compete for jobs. “We feature six days of intensive skills training, including Flash, Dreamweaver, advanced Photoshop, audio and video content gathering and editing, as well as daily presentations from leading multimedia designers, storytellers, and producers.”

“Each participant is assigned a dedicated computer terminal for the week and will have the opportunity to meet and work with industry leaders, including Brian Storm of MediaStorm; Karl Kuntz from the Columbus Dispatch; Joe Weiss from the Raleigh News & Observer; J. Carl Ganter of MediaVia; Travis Fox from Washingtonpost.com; J. Paige West, from Second Story; Andrew DeVigal, of Interactive Narratives; Alberto Cairo and Laura Ruel from UNC-CH; Mike Noe from the Rocky Mountain News; and Geoff McGhee from The New York Times.

Details and registration forms are available online at www.ibiblio.org/bootcamp. Beckman said the workshop is limited to the first 25 paid registrants.

UNC Multimedia Bootcamp Home Page Design

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Southwestern Photojournalism Conference Opens March 3

FORT WORTH, TX – The Southwestern Photojournalism Conference in Fort Worth, TX, will be held on the campus of Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary beginning on March 3, 2006, and will run through March 5.

Southwestern Photojournalism Conference posterAn advertisement for the conference provided by the Seminary that ran in the January 2006 issue of News Photographer magazine on pages 21 and 43 listed an incorrect start date for the conference. The conference actually begins on March 3 rather than on March 2, as listed in the two display advertisements.

Dr. Gregory Tomlin, director of public relations for Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, asks for photojournalists to please note the change, and points out that further registration information is available at www.swpjc.org.

Speakers this year include Pulitzer Prize-winning photojournalists John White of the Chicago Sun-Times and David Leeson of the Dallas Morning News; 2005 POYi Photographer of the Year Michael Macor of the San Francisco Chronicle; Chicago Sun-Times photojournalist Bob Black; photojournalist Naomi Lasdon of Virginia Beach, VA; and Ken Irby, photojournalism sequence leader for The Poynter Institute for Media Studies in St. Petersburg, FL.

The conference is sponsored by Southwestern Seminary along with Southern Baptist photojournalists. Download an Acrobat .PDF file of the conference’s advertisement here.

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Robert Frank To Judge Honickman First Book Prize In Photography

DURHAM, NC – Robert Frank, one of the world's most influential photographers, will judge the third Honickman First Book Prize in Photography competition sponsored by The Honickman Foundation in Philadelphia, PA, and The Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University in Durham, NC.

Frank gained attention as a prominent photojournalist with his visionary photographs of postwar America with his book The Americans in 1958, a documentary study of the United States by the Swiss photographer that was funded by a grant from the Guggenheim Foundation. As a filmmaker, his movies included Pull My Daisy, OK, End Here, and Me and My Brother. He's the winner of the Cornell Capa Award from the International Center of Photography in New York, and the International Photography Award from the Hasselblad Foundation in Sweden.

The winner of the Honickman First Book Prize in Photography receives a $3,000 USD grant, publication of a book of their photography, and a traveling exhibit of their work. The competition's judge writes the introduction for the book, which will be published by Duke University Press in association with CDS Books of the Center for Documentary Studies.

The Honickman First Book Prize in Photography is a prestigious biennial prize for American photographers. The only prize of its kind, the competition is open to American photographers of any age who "have never published a book-length work and who use their cameras for creative exploration, whether it be of places, people, or communities; of the natural or social world; of beauty at large or the lack of it; of objective or subjective realities. The prize will honor work that is visually compelling, that bears witness, and that has integrity of purpose," the CDS says.

Photographer and writer Robert Adams was the prize's inaugural judge, and he picked photographer Larry Schwarm of Kansas as the winner for his series of color photographs of dramatic prairie fires that take place each Spring in Kansas. His book, On Fire, is now in its second printing by Duke University Press.

Maria Morris Hambourg, a photographic curator at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, judged the second competition and picked a photography professor from the Rhode Island School of Design, Steven B. Smith, as the winner for his black and white photographs of "the surreal intersection of suburbia and the desert in California, Utah, Nevada, and Colorado, where sprawling suburbs are reconfiguring what was once vast unpopulated territory," published by Duke University Press as the book The Weather and a Place To Live: Photographs of the Suburban West.

Submissions for the next competition, following guidelines format, must be postmarked between June 10 and September 12, 2006. The winning photographer will be announced publicly in January 2007. The book will be published in fall 2007. A traveling exhibition will be curated every third competition, beginning in 2007.

For more information about the prize, see the CDS Web site here.

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ASMP Announces 2006 Summer Grants

The American Society of Media Photographers Foundation is now accepting grant proposals for summer 2006 funding. The deadline for this grant cycle is May 15. Application forms, lists of past grant recipients, grant deadlines, and other information is available from the ASMP Web site at www.asmp.org/foundation.

ASMP executive director Eugene Mopsik says that twice a year, ASMP Foundation grants are awarded in support of a wide range of programs to benefit photographers and the creative community they are a part of. Grant amounts vary depending upon need, but typically do not exceed $1,500. The foundation does not offer assistance grants to individual artists. In past years, ASMP Foundation grants have helped fund university seminars, non-profit educational and arts organizations, and community education programs in the States and abroad.

Recipients of last year's summer grants included the Aperture Foundation, who received a $1,500 grant to support “Confounding Expectations: Photography in Context,” a series of panel discussions featuring the leading photographers, artists and authors of our time, and PhotoAlliance, who received a $1,500 grant to anchor this year's funding for PhotoAlliance’s ongoing Emerging Artist Lecture Series and its first annual Pacific Rim Lecture.

Another summer grant winner in 2005 was The Santa Fe Center for Photography, and the $1,500 ASMP grant helped to fund three projects: a workshop by Darius Himes and Joanna Hurley called “Publishing the Photographic Book: A Primer”; a workshop by Mary Virginia Swanson titled “Presenting Your Work to the Fine Art Market”; and a seminar called “Who’s Collecting Whom?” featuring 15 investors, curators, art directors and gallery owners, and moderated by Alison Devine Nordström, the Curator of Photographs at George Eastman House. The Chicago/Midwest Chapter of ASMP received the other grant, $1,250 to support “Achieving Balance Between Passion and Profession,” a two-day retreat for professional photographers, assistants and advanced students.

Applicants will be notified within 60 days of the deadline if their application has been accepted. All grant decisions are made on a nondiscriminatory basis.

The ASMP Foundation is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization affiliated with the American Society of Media Photographers, a trade association of professional photographers. The foundation supports the charitable and educational purposes of the Society, and it encourages the professional and artistic growth of photographers and the creative communities to which they belong.

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Global Online Editing Now Open In Largest NPPA BOP Contest

DURHAM, NC – Online editing for photojournalists from as near as Raleigh to as far away as Banda Aceh, Sumatra, and Kabul, Afghanistan, is now open in the NPPA's 2006 Best Of Photojournalism still photography contest, the largest BOP competition to date. Photographers who entered more than 55,000 still images in this year's competition will have received an eMail within one day of their pictures going online to tell them how to make any change in their entry. All entrants will be able to access their pictures by Friday evening, February 17.

"This year the 55,000 still photographs entered in the Best Of Photojournalism contest is a 45% growth in the size of the contest over last year," NPPA BOP contest coordinator Thomas Kenniff said. Keith Jenkins, BOP coordinator for the contest's Web division and deputy assistant managing editor for photography at The Washington Post, reports the number of Web entries in this year's contest has more than doubled since 2005. Entries in the BOP's picture editing and television divisions are still being counted.

In the still photography contest, entrants have until Midnight (1900 GMT), Saturday February 25, to do online editing and to make any changes in the entry. Changes or corrections can be made to the captions, to the category, to the object field, and to the sequence of presentation. Kenniff asks entrants to contact him if there are any dropped or missing pictures in their entry by sending an eMail to [email protected].

NPPA's Best of Photojournalism contest is now in its fifth year. Entries have increased from 23,000 still photographs taken in 2001 and judged in 2002, to more than 38,999 still photographs taken in 2004 and judged in 2005, to this year's more than 55,000 photographs taken in 2005 and judged this Spring.

Electronic judging of the Best Of Photojournalism judging in the still photography categories begins Sunday, March 19, at The Poynter Institute for Media Studies in St. Petersburg, FL. NPPA executive director Greg Garneau will be there to report results and assist with the proceedings along with contest coordinator Kenniff and Jared Haworth, NPPA's Web site administrator. Judging of the Web categories will also take place at Poynter during the still photography judging, but with different judges.

This year's still photography judges are: Ramiro Fernandez, photography editor for People magazine; Christine McNeal, deputy managing editor for design, graphics, and photography for The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel; Ricardo Ferro, director of photography for Efeamerica; Ruth Fremson, a staff photojournalist for The New York Times; and James Colton, photography editor for Sports Illustrated magazine.

This year's Web division judges are: Margarita Corporan, a senior photography editor for America Online; Andrew DeVigal, an assistant professor at San Francisco State University and co-principal of Devigal Design; 2005 Pulitzer Prize-winning photojournalist Deanna Fitzmaurice, a staff photojournalist for the San Francisco Chronicle; and Juan Thomassie, a senior designer for USAToday.com.

Judging in the BOP television categories begins March 4 at Poynter and runs and runs through March 10, coordinated by Merry Murray of KSNW-TV in Wichita, KS, and Michael Harrity of KUSA-TV 9News in Denver, CO. Judges for the television categories are already picked, but their names will not be revealed until judging is underway.

Judging in the BOP's editing categories begins April 3 at the School of Visual Communication at Ohio University in Athens, OH, coordinated by VisCom's director, Terry Eiler. Judges for the editing categories will be announced later.

NPPA's Best Of Photojournalism contest is sponsored by Canon, Avid, The Poynter Institute for Media Studies, Hesketh.com, Ibiblio.org, Western Kentucky University, Camera Bits, Ohio University, and Merlin One.

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Pham, de Laubenfels, Named Poynter Ethics Fellows

Thé N. Pham, the photography editor for the Houston Chronicle, and Heidi de Laubenfels, assistant managing editor for visuals and technology, The Seattle Times, have been named 2006 Ethics Fellows at the Poynter Institute for Media Studies in St. Petersburg, FL.

This fifth class of sixteen Poynter Fellows will meet for one week in March, and again in 2007, to explore key ethical issues facing journalism. Pham has been an NPPA member since 1984, and de Laubenfels joined in 2000. The 2006 Ethics Fellows program is partially supported by a grant from the Ford Foundation.

Including Pham and de Laubenfels, the 2006 Ethics Fellows are: Lori Aratani, education writer, The Washington Post; John F. Burnett, correspondent, National Public Radio; Richard Chacón, ombudsman, Boston Globe; Eric Eyre, reporter, The Charleston (WV) Gazette; Manny Garcia, metro editor, The Miami Herald; Jeannine Guttman, editor and vice president, Portland Press Herald/Maine Sunday Telegram; Lonnie Isabel, a 28-year veteran of daily newspapers and a university teacher; Tom Merriman, investigative reporter, WJW Fox 8 (Cleveland, OH); Dean Miller, managing editor, Idaho Falls Post Register; Amy Morris, executive producer, WLS TV (Chicago, IL); Tim Ryan, assistant news director, KUSA 9 News (Denver, CO); Joel Sappell, assistant managing editor and executive editor/Interactive, Los Angeles Times; Barbara White Stack, editorial writer, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette; and Jocelyn Wiener; reporter, The Sacramento Bee.

The Poynter Institute is a school for journalists, future journalists, and teachers of journalism. Poynter conducts over 50 seminars annually in the areas of leadership and management, reporting and writing, broadcast, ethics and diversity, and visual journalism, as well as providing online learning through News University (www.newsu.org). The school owns the Times Publishing Company, the parent company of the St. Petersburg Times, Congressional Quarterly and other publications.

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