News Archive

Doug Vogt, Bob Woodruff Are Back In States, In Navy Hospital

Television photojournalist Doug Vogt and ABC News anchor Bob Woodruff today were flown in a military medical transport plane from the Army hospital where they were treated in Germany to Andrews Air Force Base in Maryland. When they arrived in the States the two seriously injured journalists, felled by a bomb attack two days ago in Iraq, were taken to a specialty center for the rehabilitation of brain injuries at the National Naval Medical Center in Bethesda, MD, ABC News said tonight.

Vogt and Woodruff were seriously injured Sunday morning while reporting in Iraq during an attack and explosion while traveling with U.S. and Iraqi troops near Taji, northwest of Baghdad, ABC News and wire services said. On Monday and Tuesday ABC News quoted doctors who said that both men, while severly injured, were showing signs of improvement, and that conditions were sufficiently stable to transport them today from Germany to the Naval medical center. Vogt was awake and talking, they said, and Woodruff was showing "increasing signs of consciousness."

Doug Vogt image from The Digital JournalistABC News president David Westin issued a statement on Sunday saying that an improvised explosive device went off, and after the explosion their lead vehicle in a small convoy came under small arms fire in an apparent ambush. Westin said that despite body armor, helmets, and ballistic goggles, the two were seriously injured.

ABC News said the two journalists were then taken by helicopter to a U.S. military hospital at Camp Balad, and that they were both taken into surgery. Reuters reported that both men had head injuries. ABC News also said that Vogt has a broken shoulder in addition to shrapnel wounds to the head. After surgery and treatment the two injured journalists were evacuated to military medical facilities in Landstuhl, Germany, for continued treatment. They've been there until today, when they were moved to an air base in Ramstein, Germany, for the medical evacuation flight on a C-17 hospital plane to Andrews. Also on board the flight were injured American troops who were also being evacuated to the States for medical care.

The journalists were embedded with the Army’s 4th Infantry Division in Iraq and were traveling with an Iraqi security forces in an Iraqi mechanized vehicle at the time of the explosion. An Iraqi soldier was also reported to be injured; his condition is not known.

On Sunday morning on "ABC's This Week With George Stephanopoulos," the show opened with a report from ABC White House correspondent Martha Raddatz who had information on the incident from military sources. Raddatz said that Vogt and Woodruff were traveling in the lead vehicle of a convoy riding with Iraqi security forces instead of in an American heavily armored Humvee, and that they were standing up in the vehicle's hatch and exposed when the bomb went off. Some reports say they may have been filming at the time.

Raddatz said both journalists had shrapnel wounds to the head. She said that after they were stabilized, they were flown by helicopter to a military hospital in Camp Balad, north of Baghdad. Stephanopoulos reported that Woodruff was still in surgery at the time that they were on the air Sunday morning in Washington.

Woodruff is married and has four children, and Vogt is married and has three daughters.

The Committee to Protect Journalists reports that 60 journalists have been killed in Iraq since the U.S. invasion in March 2003, with 41 of those being Iraqi journalists.

Vogt, 46, is a three-time Emmy Award-winning television photojournalist from Canada with more than two decades of experience. He’s been based in Europe covering world news for the CBC and BBC, and now for ABC News. Vogt wrote an article a year ago this week for The Digital Journalist called “Village Of Lost Souls,” about his experience covering the aftermath of the Christmas tsunami in Colombo, Sri Lanka, which can be read here.

Bob Woodruff in ABC News photoAfter the death of ABC News anchor Peter Jennings, Woodruff, 44, was named co-anchor of ABC News’s “World News Tonight” along with Elizabeth Vargas. The two have been co-anchoring the evening report for a little over a month, with one reporter in the studio as the other reports from the field. Woodruff’s ABC News biography says that he also contributes to “Nightline” and other ABC News programs, and covered the presidential campaign of North Carolina Senator John Edwards during the presidential primaries.

During the initial invasion of Iraq, Woodruff was embedded with the First Marine Division, and before moving to New York in 2002 he was based in ABC’s bureau in London. He was an attorney before becoming a journalist and was working in Beijing, China, at the time of the Tiananmen Square uprising and was hired by ABC as a translator. Shortly after that experience he switched careers to journalism.

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ABC's Doug Vogt, Bob Woodruff, Seriously Injured In Iraqi Bombing

 

Television photojournalist Doug Vogt and ABC News anchor Bob Woodruff were seriously injured while reporting in Iraq during an attack and explosion while traveling with U.S. and Iraqi troops near Taji, northwest of Baghdad, ABC News and wire services said.

Doug Vogt image from The Digital JournalistABC News president David Westin issued a statement saying that an improvised explosive device went off, and after the explosion their lead vehicle in a small convoy came under small arms fire in an apparent ambush. Westin said that despite body armor, helmets, and ballistic goggles, the two were seriously injured.

ABC News says that the two journalists were taken by helicopter to a U.S. military hospital at Camp Balad after the attack, and then they were both taken into surgery. Reuters reported that both men had head injuries. ABC News also reports that Vogt has a broken shoulder in addition to shrapnel wounds to the head. Westin said in a later statement that the military would evacuate Woodruff and Vogt to military medical facilities in Landstuhl, Germany, for continued treatment.

The journalists were embedded with the Army’s 4th Infantry Division in Iraq and were traveling with an Iraqi security forces in an Iraqi mechanized vehicle at the time of the explosion. An Iraqi soldier was also reported to be injured; his condition is not known.

On Sunday morning on "ABC's This Week With George Stephanopoulos," the show opened with a report from ABC White House correspondent Martha Raddatz who had information on the incident from military sources. Raddatz said that Vogt and Woodruff were traveling in the lead vehicle of a convoy riding with Iraqi security forces instead of in an American heavily armored Humvee, and that they were standing up in the vehicle's hatch and exposed when the bomb went off. Some reports say they may have been filming at the time.

Raddatz said both journalists had shrapnel wounds to the head. She said that after they were stabilized, they were flown by helicopter to a military hospital in Camp Balad, north of Baghdad. Stephanopoulos reported that Woodruff was still in surgery at the time that they were on the air Sunday morning in Washington.

Woodruff is married and has four children, and Vogt is married and has three daughters.

The Committee to Protect Journalists reports that 60 journalists have been killed in Iraq since the U.S. invasion in March 2003, with 41 of those being Iraqi journalists.

Vogt, 46, is a three-time Emmy Award-winning television photojournalist from Canada with more than two decades of experience. He’s been based in Europe covering world news for the CBC and BBC, and now for ABC News. Vogt wrote an article a year ago this week for The Digital Journalist called “Village Of Lost Souls,” about his experience covering the aftermath of the Christmas tsunami in Colombo, Sri Lanka, which can be read here.

Bob Woodruff in ABC News photoAfter the death of ABC News anchor Peter Jennings, Woodruff, 44, was named co-anchor of ABC News’s “World News Tonight” along with Elizabeth Vargas. The two have been co-anchoring the evening report for a little over a month, with one reporter in the studio as the other reports from the field. Woodruff’s ABC News biography says that he also contributes to “Nightline” and other ABC News programs, and covered the presidential campaign of North Carolina Senator John Edwards during the presidential primaries.

During the initial invasion of Iraq, Woodruff was embedded with the First Marine Division, and before moving to New York in 2002 he was based in ABC’s bureau in London. He was an attorney before becoming a journalist and was working in Beijing, China, at the time of the Tiananmen Square uprising and was hired by ABC as a translator. Shortly after that experience he switched careers to journalism.

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NCAA Meeting To Consider Use Of Athletes' Photos Online

By Donald R. Winslow

AUSTIN, TX - Officials from the National Collegiate Athletic Association will meet next Friday at NCAA headquarters in Indianapolis to discuss whether SportsShooter.com member photographers are endangering NCAA student athletes' eligibility, or violating any NCAA regulations, by publishing the athletes' pictures in Web site portfolios. Initially planned for Tuesday, the meeting now won't take place until Friday so that members of the NCAA's public relations and communications staff can also take part in the discussion, News Photographer learned today.

The NCAA meeting comes after several SportsShooter.com members received cease-and-desist letters this week from a handful of university eligibility and compliance administrators in athletic departments at NCAA member schools. The letters asked the photographers to remove images of student athletes from their Web site portfolios.

In question is whether SportsShooter.com Web site portfolios that contain pictures of NCAA athletes do, or do not, put a student athlete's NCAA amateur eligibility at risk, and if the NCAA has the authority to tell photographers that they cannot publish game photographs in an online portfolio. NCAA regulations prohibit the use of pictures of college amateur athletes for "promotional" or "commercial" purposes but not as "editorial" content, so long as the image is not being used to promote a business, service, or commercial venture.

While sports photojournalist Rich Clarkson believes the NCAA has a clear understanding, at the top of their leadership, of the editorial use of pictures online and hopes to be able clarify that use for the college compliance officials who are faced with protecting their student athletes' eligibility, Grover Sanschagrin - the executive producer and administrator of the popular Web site Sportsshooter.com - isn't so sure. "This issue isn't just about SportsShooter.com," he told News Photographer. "The excuse being used against SportsShooter.com members can (and probably will) be used against photographers and their own personal Web sites and portfolios."

Sanschagrin said that he is aware of "multiple eMails from various universities asking us to remove all pictures of all student athletes from SportsShooter.com. I also know that our members are getting eMails from them as well, and there is a lot of confusion regarding the legitimate use of images in an online portfolio."

He said that one such eMail to SportsShooter.com was from Phillip J. Wille, who identifies himself as an "eligibility and compliance specialist" for the University of Wyoming. Wille wrote, "We have contacted each individual photographer who has used our student-athletes and asked them to remove those photographs. To let you know, we have contacted the NCAA on your site SPECIFICALLY, and have been told that it IS a violation of 12.5.2.2 for our athletes to be pictured on your site because it promotes your business."

In response to Wille's assertion, Sanschagrin said he replied to him that SportsShooter.com does not use images at all, but that their members display images on their individual (Web) home pages; that no images are for sale on SportsShooter.com and no products using any images of athletes are for sale anywhere on SportsShooter.com; that SportsShooter.com is a community of professional (and student) photographers who are sharing images in an attempt to learn and grow; and, "Since no images are for sale, and no images are being used on any product of any kind, and no images are being used to promote any products of any kind, I do not see how images on SportsShooter.com are a violation of this bylaw."

Wille's note to Sanschagrin on January 20, 2006, seems to be a direct contradiction to what the NCAA said back in November when they determined that the use of Syracuse University student athletes' images in SportsShooter.com Web site portfolios constituted "editorial" use, and that photographers' pictures from games that were displayed in member portfolios were not "commercial" and were not "promotional" and therefore did not threaten a player's amateur eligibility.

The NCAA's determination in that instance was the result of Susan Edson, Syracuse University's athletic communication director, threatening to revoke photography credentials issued to the school's newspaper, The Daily Orange, and to a local newspaper if staff photographers didn't remove images from their SportsShooter.com Web portfolios of Syracuse football players. The pictures were game action photos from a recent Syracuse home football game.

Edson’s concerns were based in NCAA rule 15.5.2.2 stating that to retain a student athlete’s eligibility, the player or his or her institution must take steps to stop the publication of the athlete’s name or picture “on commercial items (e.g., shirts, sweatshirts, serving trays, playing cards, posters or is used to promote a commercial product sold by an individual or agency without the student-athlete's knowledge or permission.) … Such steps are not required in cases in which a student-athlete's photograph is sold by an individual or agency (e.g., private photographer, news agency) for private use."

Edson met with photographers, Syracuse professors, and a representative from the National Press Photographers Association to discuss the matter and the NCAA was asked for an interpretation. After the NCAA decided that SportsShooter.com is an editorial site, Edson told News Photographer, "We’re all happy that we were able to come to a conclusion that worked for everybody."

Apparently the matter has come to a boil again as the result of recent eMails and discussion board postings among NCAA schools' compliance officers about SportsShooter.com. The compliance officials may be unaware that in the November situation with Syracuse the NCAA's subsequent decision was that the Web site is an "editorial" use of photographs. College compliance officials appear to be free to act on their own and send out letters like the cease-and-desist communiques without consulting the NCAA, but they can also consult NCAA officials if they want to seek the association's interpretation on a situation.

"I've talked with various people within the NCAA staff for several years about such issues and there's a collision of realistic use of pictures with the (NCAA) membership's concerns to keep commercialism away from student athletes until their eligibility is complete," Rich Clarkson told News Photographer. Clarkson, a former NPPA president who is a contract photographer for Sports Illustrated and the former director of photography for National Geographic magazine, is the president of Rich Clarkson & Associates in Denver. He is the creator of NCAA Photos, a full service assignment and stock agency that does all photography for the NCAA's 93 national championship games. Clarkson also occasionally serves as an advisor on photography issues as they affect the college sports scene.

"It is probably not so much misunderstandings as it is a lack of understanding, and the problem comes when the compliance officers at member schools, conscientiously trying to protect their athletes from NCAA rules violations, have often overreacted," Clarkson said. "The problem really is inherent in how those rules are passed in convention by the member schools - and then have to be implemented by the NCAA staff. Over the years there have been rules passed to correct one situation which then create a different problem. The results are inadvertent."

Clarkson believes that NCAA leaders already understand the nature of SportsShooter.com and believe that it is essentially an educational Internet meeting place for professional photojournalists who are helping each other. About the upcoming Indianapolis meeting, Clarkson says, "The NCAA will meet to review all this and hopefully will be able to pass along (to member schools) an interpretation that makes sense for everyone, to the compliance officials at the various schools as well as to the media."

 

Previous stories:

NCAA Decides Portfolio Shots Are Editorial Use

College Athletics v. Photojournalists: A Matchup Of Property Rights

Syracuse University's Credential Threat Raises Copyright Questions

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NPPA Member Tony Ranze, 44

Tony Ranze, 44, director of photography for The Ledger in Lakeland, FL, died Sunday after a four-year battle with cancer, his newspaper reported today. Ranze, an NPPA member since 1991, was the winner of the Joseph Costa Courtroom Photography Award in 1990. In addition to his director role at The Ledger, he was also the photography coordinator for The New York Times Regional Media Group.

The Ledger said that Ranze was diagnosed with multiple myeloma bone cancer four years ago and that he was undergoing treatment at the University of Arkansas Medical Center in Little Rock, AR, when he died, not long after his fourth bone marrow transplant.

"A Celebration of the Life of Tony Ranze" will be held Saturday, January 28, at 6:30 p.m. at the home of Jennifer and Scott Audette in North Lakeland, FL. For more information eMail [email protected].

Ranze graduated from the Southeast Center of Photographic Studies in Daytona Beach, FL, in 1984 and he joined the ledger in 1985 as a staff photojournalist. He frequently freelanced for the wire services during his two-decade career at The Ledger, and covered major events such as hurricanes, Super Bowls, shuttle launches, and NASCAR auto races.

He’s survived by his mother, Isabelle Ranze, and a sister, Melinda Brock, and his four children: Anthony Nicholas Ranze, 23; Elisa Ranze, 22; and Joseph and Kaitlyn Ranze, 18.

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McDonogh, Cook, Win Top Kentucky POY Honors

LOUISVILLE, KY - Pat McDonogh of the Louisville Courier-Journal won the title of 2005 Still Photographer of the Year, an WAVE-TV’s Drew Cook, an NPPA member, was named 2005 Television Photographer of the Year at this year’s Kentucky News Photographers Association seminar and contest this weekend in Louisville, KY, KNPA president Joe Imel said.

“We had a great seminar weekend with more than 120 students and professionals attending,” Imel reported.

NPPA member David Stephenson of the Lexington Herald-Leader was the still photography runner-up, and NPPA member Scott Utterback of WAVE-TV was the television runner-up. Stephenson also won the Sports Photographer of the Year title, and the runner-up in the Sports POY category was Andy Lyons of Getty Images.

The KNPA College POY award was won by Christian Hansen, a student at Western Kentucky University in Bowling Green, KY, and the runner-up was NPPA member Jim Winn, a December graduate of WKU.

For the second year in a row, WAVE-TV won Station of the Year honors for the Louisville market, and WPSD-TV in Paducah, KY, won SOY honors for markets outside Louisville.

The Lexington Herald-Leader won Newspaper of the Year for papers with circulation more than 25,000, and The Daily News in Bowling Green, KY, won Newspaper of the Year for papers with circulation less than 25,000.

Seminar speakers included Vincent Laforet, a contract photographer for The New York Times; Susan Biddle of The Washington Post; freelance photographer Amy Toensing from Philadelphia, PA; independent Washington, DC, television producer Ray Farkas; and KUSA-TV’s Corky Scholl, who is the NPPA Ernie Crisp Television News Photographer of the Year.

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Photojournalist Larry Davis Dies In Seattle

By Donald R. Winslow

Former Los Angeles Times photojournalist Larry Davis, 61, died Thursday near Lake Washington in Seattle. His death was confirmed tonight by Los Angeles Times assistant managing editor for photography Colin Crawford, and by Davis’s long-time friend and former coworker Hyungwon Kang, a senior staff photographer for Reuters News Pictures who is now based in Washington, DC.

Larry Davis, photo by Tom StoryDavis took his own life Thursday afternoon soon after friends in Seattle, as well as many from around the country, became concerned for his welfare when they received an eMail from Davis that was titled “Good bye.” Friends in Seattle who got the eMail tried to call him and then went to check on him, Kang said. When friends could not find Davis they realized that he might be at a boat dock on the lake where Davis spread his late wife’s cremated ashes on the water two years ago this week.

Kang said the friends went to the dock and found Davis alive, “But he was locked inside his van and would not be talked out of his plans.” Kang said the friends told him tonight that “Larry was clear and determined and asked us to leave. When he saw that we wouldn’t leave, he ‘bolted’ in the van (drove away quickly).” The friends called 911. “By the time they and the police caught up with him, it was ‘too late,’ he was dead,” Kang said. Davis apparently circled around the parking lot and back close to the edge of the lake before killing himself.

Tonight the friends told Kang, “We were there to tell Larry that he was loved, but Larry was very clear in his wishes and in his course of action.” Kang, who knew Davis very well over the years, said, “Larry has always been a very focused guy. Once he says something, he does it. His eMail was titled ‘Good bye.’ He said, ‘This is my final note to all my friends.’ I couldn’t read it at first. It was shocking. But then I read it through, and that’s when I called Larry’s sister-in-law (in Seattle, Lori Benner). She said police had located him and were going to talk with him. Then I didn’t hear back from her and I was worried. Then I called Bob Chamberlin (at the Times’s picture desk), and he told me he'd just talked to her, and that she'd just learned that Larry killed himself.”

Davis’s wife, Bertha Jo Hagfors ("B.J."), died two years ago this week from cancer, Kang said, and the photographer was heartbroken. Davis left the Los Angles Times in 1995 when a buyout package was offered to senior staff members. Kang said Davis and his wife decided to take the buyout, pack up, and leave town. “He bought a Ford Explorer,” Kang said, “and it was the first private car that he’d bought. He’d always had company cars until then. They loaded it with everything they owned and went to Seattle, and when they left town he was so happy then. He was freelancing for The New York Times and some others, and they had family in the area.”

Kang stayed in touch with Davis because they were good friends. “He interviewed me for my internship at the Los Angeles Times in 1986, and he became my mentor and then my good buddy,” Kang said tonight. “The Times had several darkrooms that photographers had to share, and he was a generous person, the kind of person who would share his darkroom with an intern. He was a gifted photojournalist. I’m going to miss him. He was a wonderful human being.”

Davis saved Kang’s life several times on the worst night of the Los Angeles riots in South Central, Kang remembers. “Larry volunteered to drive me while I shot photos of the riots. People with baseball bats and weapons chased me down several times that night while I was shooting. I’d jump in the car and we’d take off, and then go shoot again. Larry saved me.”

Seattle's Dr. Hugh M. Foy, MD, a trauma surgeon for nearly three decades, was one of Davis's newest friends in Seattle. He was on the scene Thursday near the lake moments after Davis took his own life. Foy is an associate professor at the University of Washington School of Medicine, and he also received Davis's "Good bye" eMail on Thursday. Responding to the group of other people on the eMail's address list Thursday night, Foy wrote (used with Foy's permission), "I am sorry for all of you today, as I think most of you knew Larry better than I. But for our short friendship I feel honored that he included me in his obvious last eMail. He helped me with my computer, sent me political blogs. We shared dreams of the return of compassionate democracy. He was my "IT" (information technology) guy and did it well. What an ultimate irony of modern life that he 'penned' his suicide note via eMail.

"I was the first on the scene arriving just before the police and medics," Foy wrote to Davis's friends. "I told the assembled dozen or so police and medics that he was a great man, a Pulitzer-winning photographer, and a great guy who had lost his wife after a long battle with cancer. They were respectful and grateful for my sharing a few remarks of his character." And Foy attempted to comfort Davis's friends in his note with a doctor's insight: "I have been a trauma surgeon most of the last 28 years ... I can assure you that he felt no physical pain as he died ... You are all fortunate to have known him as well as you did. I am grateful for his friendship."

Photojournalist Tom Story in Phoenix, AZ, also got Davis's "Good bye" eMail on Thursday afternoon. He remembers the photographer as one of his best friends, going back to their college days together at Arizona State University and Con Keyes's photojournalism class. "I met Larry back when we were in Con's class in the mid-1970s with Bill Frakes, Andy Hayt, and John McDonough (who all went on to shoot for Sports Illustrated). Con left ASU to become director of photography at the Los Angeles Times when Jim Dooley went to Newsday," Story remembers, "and Larry started freelancing for the Los Angeles Times." Davis had already left a job in the clothing business to shoot for the Mesa Tribune and the Tempe Daily News. "Con told him, 'Come on over and we'll see what we can do,' and Larry quit and moved to L.A. and freelanced, and then he joined the staff."

Story said that when Davis moved to Seattle his major shooting client was The New York Times. "But when the contract flap came up for freelancers, he told me, 'I can't do this,' and he refused to sign the new contract and he stopped getting assignments from The New York Times." Story said that by this time Davis had established a new computer technology business for himself, and that it was a source of income. Davis confided in his friend that it was just as well that he wasn't shooting at the time. "He was having health problems, and B.J. was fighting her long battle with cancer."

Story remembers being in San Francisco the night of the October 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake, and he was shooting a collapsed and burning building in the Marina District when he heard a familiar voice shout out from behind him, "Is this the Kodak designated picture spot?" Story said Davis had been on the first plane into San Francisco after the quake and was already in the middle of town and shooting that night, just hours after the disaster. "He told me what he'd already seen and shot, and where the good stuff was to go cover, and he filled me in on what he already knew. He was one of my dearest friends," Story told News Photographer.

Photographs from Los Angeles riots by Davis, Kang, and fellow staff photographer Kirk D. McCoy were the main images in the Los Angeles Times’s Pulitzer entry that year for spot news. It won the 1993 Pulitzer Prize for Spot News team coverage. (At the time, many thought the dramatic pictures should have been entered separately in the news picture category, instead of part of the overall coverage.) “On the day of the Pulitzer announcement, Larry told me, ‘Great job!’ and he never lost his composure taking in the news,” Kang told News Photographer tonight.

Tonight Crawford said that Davis had been one of the Times’s “heavy hitters.” “He covered the Pope for us, the riots, the first Gulf War from Israel, and he traveled a lot for us.” Davis was also well known for his world travels and coverage of conflicts in the Middle East and Central America.

Kang left the Los Angeles Times in 1997, two years after Davis, and went to work for the Associated Press in Washington before joining Reuters News Pictures. “Photojournalism has lost a great guy, a truly dedicated photojournalist,” Kang said tonight. In addition to photography, Davis was a great Apple Macintosh computer aficionado. “The last time we talked we had this great conversation about Macintosh. He knew Macintosh inside and out. Whenever I needed to know anything about my computer, I called him. I don’t know who I’m going to call anymore.”

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Nikon's Michael "Mike" Phillips, 60

SAN FRANCISCO, CA - Michael "Mike" Phillips, 60, of Nikon Professional Services, died suddenly on January 9, 2006, in San Francisco. He was found at his home by a coworker who went to check on him after he failed to appear for work at a Nikon display booth at the Apple MacWorld Conference at the Moscone Center, the San Francisco Bay Area Press Photographers Association president told its members today. Phillips was active in SFBAPPA events and was one of the association's frequent speakers at seminars and workshops, as well as a long-time supporter.

A San Francisco native, Phillips spent his entire professional career at Nikon, joining them in 1970 after college at San Jose State University and the University of California at Davis, according to the family-provided obituary in the San Francisco Chronicle. Phillips worked for Nikon Professional Services (NPS) as a technical advisor and as a liaison between NPS and professional photographers. He was also a photographer, attended many major news events with NPS to assist working professionals on assignment, as well as shooting his own photographs at Olympic Games, World Series, Super Bowls, Kentucky Derbies, space launches, and other big events.

Phillips is survived by his mother, Marie Phillips Japs, of Davis; his sister, Suzanne Finigan of San Francisco; his brother, Kirk, and a nephew, Collin, both of Northern California. There are no funeral services planned at this time, but Paul Sakuma of the SFBAPPA reports that plans for a wake are pending.

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Dai Baker, Travis Fox, Top WHNPA TV Winners

WASHINGTON, DC – The White House News Photographers Association has announced that ITN photographer Dai Baker has been named “Photographer of the Year” for 2006 in the “Eyes of History” video contest, and NPPA member Travis Fox of washingtonpost.com was awarded video “Editor of the Year.” Judging of the WHNPA still photography contest will be held in Washington later this month.

WHNPA said Baker, who has worked for ITN for 12 years, also won “Photographer of the Year” in 2005, giving him back-to-back wins. Baker’s work for 2006 included several pieces on Hurricane Katrina. “I am especially proud of the fact that people assumed I had a lot of time to film these pieces, but in fact we only ever have one or two days at the most,” said Baker. WHNPA video judge Tim Wall of CNN in Atlanta said, “There was nothing but excellence in every aspect of his work.” Ali Ghanbari, a WHNPA judge from WJW-TV in Cleveland, said, “Baker has a great eye, from framing to punctuation to working with his reporter.”

The WHNPA “Editor of the Year” is Travis Fox of washingtonpost.com. This is Fox’s third title. He won “Editor of the Year” in 2002 and 2003 and “Photographer of the Year” in 2002. “As journalists, we hope to make a connection between our readers and the people on whom we report,” Fox said. “These awards will hopefully bring more attention to the people and issues I tried to illustrate last year, whether it is an authoritarian regime in Azerbaijan or the victims of Hurricane Katrina.”

A list of all TV winners in each category is posted here.

“The work produced by our members is a remarkable visual record of the past year,” said WHNPA president Susan Walsh of the Associated Press. “Baker and Fox should be very proud of their accomplishments. Our talented members cover every aspect of our world, from local to national to international stories. Our members are the best of the best.”

Judges for the video photography contest were Elaine Fisher of WTXF-TV in Philadelphia, PA; Ghanbari of WJW-TV in Cleveland, OH; and Wall of CNN in Atlanta, GA. Judges for the video editing contest were Jeff Chase of CNN; Merry Murray of KSNW-TV in Wichita, KS; and Jeramy Rosenberg of KMGH-TV in Denver, CO.

The top winners of the still and television contests will be honored at the annual “Eyes of History” Gala on May 6, 2006, at the Ritz-Carlton Hotel in Washington. The black-tie event celebrates all the winning photojournalists and nearly 1,000 guests, including the President of the United States, government dignitaries, and industry celebrities, will attend.

The WHNPA still photography contest will be judged January 28-29, 2006, at the Corcoran Gallery of Art and Design. Judging is open to the public WHNPA encourages students, professionals, and anyone interested in photography to attend.

The WHNPA and "The Eyes of History" are sponsored in part by Nikon Spirit Initiative, Tiffen/Domke, and the Corcoran Gallery of Art and Design.

For more information about "The Eyes of History" and to view the winning images and videos, visit the WHNPA Web site at www.whnpa.org.

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ASMP Announces Spring 2006 Grant Winners

PHILADELPHIA, PA - Eugene Mopsik, executive director of the American Society of Media Photographers (ASMP), announced that five ASMP Foundation grants for Spring 2006 have been given to non-profit groups who strive to educate photographers, and that applications for 2006 grants are being accepted until May 15 and November 15.

The five Spring 2006 grant recipients are:

AINA Photo, a Paris-based branch of AINA, Afghanistan's Media and Cultural Center (www.ainaworld.org). AINA Photo trains Afghan men and women in photojournalism. Its goal is to build local talent and foster free expression in a country where even the possession of photographs was once forbidden by the Taliban. The agency was given a grant of $1,500 for its "Afghanistan through Afghan eyes" program to help support photojournalism students.

The Society for Photographic Education (www.spenational.org) was awarded $1,500 to help support student portfolio reviews at the 43rd Annual SPE National Conference to be held in March 2006 in Chicago, IL.

The Santa Fe Center for Photography (www.sfcp.org) offers symposia that educate photographers in key aspects of the business side of fine-art photography: marketing and promotion, book publication, and working with collectors and curators. SFCP has been granted $1,500 to help support the symposium titled "The Creative Edge: The Business of Being an Artist," to be held January 21 in Santa Monica, CA.

FotoFest, an photographic arts and education organization (www.fotofest.org) based in Houston, TX, is the creator of the international Biennial of Photography and Photo-related Art as a showcase for important new photographic talent. FototFest was awarded $1,500 to help support speaker expenses at a workshop called "Making the Most of Digital Technologies" which will be presented at the 11th Biennial of Photography and Photo-related Art, to be held in Houston in March and April of 2006.

The Central Florida Chapter of ASMP (www.asmpcentralflorida.org) has received $350 to help support a student seminar series to be presented over the coming four months. Led by Amanda Sosa Stone, a creative consultant and artist representative, the series will provide instruction on assisting, corporate and editorial photography, and business practices in photography.

 

The ASMP Foundation supports the education of ASMP members and the creative photographic community to which they belong, encouraging the professional and artistic growth of photographers. Grants are awarded twice each year. ASMP says the number of grants and specific amounts given depend on available funds and the needs and merits of applicant programs. The remaining application deadlines for 2006 are May 15 and November 15. Application information and forms are available online at www.asmp.org/foundation.

ASMP Foundation board members include Mary Virginia Swanson, a photography consultant; Kenny Irby, coordinator of the Visual Journalism programs for the Poynter Institute for Media Studies; Ben Colman, a commercial photographer and ASMP board member; John Giammatteo, a commercial photographer and ASMP board member; and photojournalist Dan Lamont, chairman of the Foundation board and an ASMP board member.

For more information contact Mopsik at [email protected].

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Entry Deadline For Payne Journalism Ethics Awards

The deadline to nominate an individual or an organization for the Payne Awards for Ethics in Journalism is February 24, 2006. The program is in its seventh year of honoring the highest ethical standards of print, broadcast, and new media journalism, and is adminstered by the University of Oregon School of Journalism and Communication.

The awards for ethical decisions made in 2005 will be awarded to individuals - including students and professionals - and organizations from among the nominations received before the February deadline. There is a $1,000 USD prize for individual and student awards, and nominations will be accepted from peers or from the individuals or the organizations involved. Information about the simple nomination form is online at http://payneawards.uoregon.edu.

Last year's winners include The Denver Post, for adhering to an established privacy policy by not naming an alleged rape victim even though competing Denver media named the woman; Kevin Sites, for "responding thoughtfully, including use of his Web Blog, when his war footage generated negative reaction"; and a special citation to Jon Leiberman for "speaking out when he disagreed with his employer, even at the risk of being fired." (Leiberman, formerly Sinclair Broadcasting's Washington DC bureau chief, was fired after publicly protesting his employer's decision to air programming critical of Democratic presidential candidate John Kerry just days before the 2004 election.)

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