News Archive

NPPA National Best Of Photojournalism Day A Hit

NPPA's National Best of Photojournalism day at the Crown Plaza Hotel in downtown San Antonio, TX, on the city's famous Riverwalk, was filled with educational speakers, break-out workshops, and wrapped up at night with a BOP awards dinner. The special event marked the end of NPPA's annual two-day board of directors meeting, including the installation of the new national officers.

The executive committee and board of directors met in San Antonio starting on Wednesday June 22, and NPPA's official business meeting continued through Thursday and concluded at 4 a.m. on Saturday morning. The board spent many hours Friday afternoon, Friday night, and Saturday morning going over the association's proposed budget for the 2005-2006 Fiscal Year before adopting the $1.35 million dollar spreadsheet.

Gene Policinski, executive director of the First Amendment Center, the morning's keynote speaker, reported on the state of the First Amendment and what's being done about the ongoing assault on journalists' freedoms. In conjunction with his address the First Amendment Center released the results of a study aimed at America's perception of the First Amendment. Policinski, a 27-year journalism veteran who started with newspapers in Indiana before moving to the Gannett News Service bureau in Washington, DC, was the page one editor for USA Today and the founding editor for USA Today Baseball Weekly before joining the Freedom Forum in 1996.

Educational workshop speakers included BOP Newspaper Photographer of the Year Jim Gehrz, of the Minneapolis Star Tribune, and BOP Ernie Crisp Television News Photographer of the Year Corky Scholl, of KUSA-TV, Denver, CO. Other speakers included Scott Mc Kiernan, director of ZUMA Press in Laguna Beach, CA, and a presentation by Eric Kehe, director of photography for Denver's KUSA-TV, the BOP large market Station of the Year.

Also in the line-up of speakers was NPPA's Best Of Photojournalism Television Editor of the Year Brian Weister, of KMGH-TV in Denver, CO, who talked about the art of editing and what he did to be NPPA's Editor of the Year two years running; Andrea Bruce Woodall, a staff photojournalist for The Washington Post who focused on community journalism in Iraq without being embedded with the military; Santiago Lyon, director of photography for The Associated Press, who talked about their coverage in Iraq and the Pulitzer Prize-winning essay from their war coverage; and Greg Smith, NPPA's Business Practices Commmittee chair, who talked about issues facing freelance photojournalists today and NPPA's "Best Practices" business recommendations.

The BOP awards banquet followed Saturday evening beginning at 7 p.m. and include Television and Still photography awards along with the Sprague Awards and other NPPA honors and recognitions.

New NPPA national officers were sworn in Saturday evening before the awards. Alicia Wagner Calzada, a staff photojournalist for Rumbo in San Antonio, was elected president, and Tony Overman, Region 11 director from Olympia, WA, was elected vice president. Jim Sulley, who has served six years on the NPPA board as a Regional director or associate director, was elected treasurer.

Jim Gehrz grew up in St. Paul, MN, where he dreamed of some day taking photographs for one of the hometown newspapers. While studying at Hamline University took photographs for the school’s news bureau and also freelanced for community newspapers in the area. His first fulltime newspaper job was at the Worthington Daily Globe where he worked for a year-and-a-half before becoming a staff photojournalist at the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, a position he held for nearly 14 years. In 1999 he joined the St. Paul Pioneer Press, then joined the photography staff at the Minneapolis Star Tribune in January 2004. He’s has been named state Photographer of the Year ten times (four times by the Minnesota News Photographers Association, six by the Wisconsin News Photographers Association) and one of his photographs from Super Bowl XXXII was honored as the Pro Football Hall of Fame Photograph of the Year.

Washington Post photographer Andrea Bruce Woodall has traveled to Iraq five times since the war began. Most recently, she arrived a week shy of the first anniversary of the invasion in March and stayed through a period in which a widespread insurgency against the U.S. occupation flared anew, and U.S. fatalities approached 1,000.

She was born in Lafayette, IN, and graduated from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1995 with a degree from the School of Journalism and Mass Communication. Although reporting was her concentration in school, her senior year introduced her to photography where she discovered her passion for photojournalism. After several internships, she started her newspaper photography career in 1997 atThe Concord Monitor in New Hampshire where she worked for four years. After a short stint on the photo staff at The St. Petersburg Times, she landed a staff job at The Washington Post in 2001. In 1999 she was named the New Hampshire Press Photographer of the year. She has been named White House News Photographer of the Year in 2003 for her coverage of Washington, DC, post September 11th, and her pictures of former Vice President Al Gore. This year she was again named White House News Photographer of the Year and was awarded the John Faber Overseas Press Club Award for photos of an Iraqi prostitute. She lives in Maryland with her two dogs.

Santiago Lyon is director of photography of The Associated Press, responsible for the AP's global photography report and the hundreds of photographers and photo editors worldwide who produce it. He has 20 years' experience in news service photography and has won multiple photojournalism awards for his coverage of conflicts around the globe. Under Lyon's direction, the war in Iraq earned the AP its 48th Pulitzer Prize in 2005, for work by a team of photographers. The AP's winning entry for breaking news photography, its 29th for photography, consisted of 20 photos from Iraq by 11 different photographers, five of them Iraqis.

Lyon joined AP in 1991 in Cairo, Egypt, after working for United Press International and Reuters. He has covered stories in Mexico, Central and South America, the 1991 Gulf War, Croatia, Bosnia, Albania, Kosovo, Israel, Palestine, Libya, Syria, Iraq, Somalia, Rwanda, Yemen, Sri Lanka and Afghanistan. In 1995, while on assignment in Sarajevo, he was wounded by mortar shrapnel. Lyon served as AP photo editor for Spain and Portugal from 1995 until 2003, when he accepted a Nieman Fellowship at Harvard University.

Scott Mc Kiernan boasts over 30 years of wide ranging experience in photojournalism as a photographer, picture editor, and agent. Averaging 300 assignments annually for more than a decade, Mc Kiernan developed a reputation as a world-class shooter and he founded ZUMA Press in 1995. ZUMA Press is now the world’s largest independent editorial agency and largest owned and run by a working photojournalist.

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Future Unclear For Cameras In New York Courts

 Last week’s ruling by the New York Court of Appeals, the state’s highest court, that there is no constitutional right for news cameras to be in New York Courts puts the matter back into the hands of the state’s legislature, unless it goes before the United States Supreme Court first. The legislature passed a law allowing cameras in New York courts from 1987 to 1997 as an experiment, but then let the law expire without approving a new one.

The 7-0 Court of Appeals ruling in Albany, NY, said that the press has a constitutional right to attend trials the same as other citizens, but that the right does not extend to filming, videotaping or broadcasting inside court. “We agree with the (NY) Supreme Court and the (NY) Appellate Division that there is no First Amendment or article I, section 8 right to televise a trial,” the court ruled. “Though the public acquires information about trials chiefly through the press and electronic media, the press is not imbued with any special right of access. Rather, the media possesses ‘the same right of access as the public … so that they may report what people in attendance have seen and heard.’”

“The Court’s decision reads as though the First Amendment were an afterthought,” said attorney Jonathan Sherman, one of the lawyers of Boies, Schiller & Flexner LLP who represent Court TV. “This is a statute that upholds an absolute ban on speech about government proceedings that the Court concedes are required to be constitutionally open to attend and to be reported upon. That result is at war with the core of modern First Amendment doctrine. The First Amendment tolerates and indeed promotes vindication of fair trial principles. But in no context other than that of in-court cameras does it permit fair trial principles alone to sustain an absolute ban on information in every case in which a trial could be compromised.”

Unless the New York Legislature takes action and approves a new law, the only recourse is a ruling by the United States Supreme Court on the case or another one like it. Recent statements from U.S. Supreme Court Justices Souter, Breyer, and O’Connor condemning televised proceedings with “uncharacteristic out-of-court vigor,” Sherman said, suggest that the Supreme Court will be inhospitable.

In Court TV v. State of New York, a case filed by Court TV in 2001 challenging the law barring audiovisual coverage in New York courts, a lower court ruled in July 2003 that New York’s statute banning the photography is indeed legal. Court TV wanted to televise trials in New York as they happened and they appealed the lower court’s decision. The National Press Photographers Association, through the Advocacy Committee and NPPA’s lawyers, along with other media groups, submitted amicus curiae (friend of the court) briefs supporting Court TV’s position.

“I am extremely disappointed in the Court’s decision,” said attorney Mickey H. Osterreicher, who helped draft the amicus briefs for the NPPA as of counsel. Osterreicher, who was a photojournalist in Buffalo, NY, for both television and newspapers before entering law, has been an NPPA member since 1972 and is on the NPPA’s Advocacy Committee. “It is not just Court TV which has lost in this case but the public itself. The fact that the Court chose to deal with the First Amendment question in a footnote and even then framed it as a Sixth Amendment issue stating that Section 52 (per se ban) is ‘narrowly tailored to serve the governmental interests at issue, namely insuring that criminal defendants receive fair trials’ begs the question presented.

“What is most evident is the Court’s unwillingness to ‘circumscribe the authority constitutionally delegated to the Legislature’ even if the law that was enacted over 50 years ago is anachronistic and overly broad. It will be interesting to see if Court TV decides to bring this important case to the United States Supreme Court and whether or not they (the Supreme Court) grant certiorari.”

NPPA’s Advocacy Committee has vigorously supported Court TV’s effort to overturn New York’s courtroom camera ban. Advocacy Committee chairperson Alicia Wagner Calzada, who is also NPPA’s vice president, said, “I am disappointed in the ruling. Cameras in the courtroom enhance the public's understanding of complex trials and of the justice system as a whole. Our founding fathers intended for trials to be open and public. In theory, the public has access to public trials. But in reality, the public relies on the media to bring them into the courtroom just as they rely on the media to bring them into city council chambers, school board meetings, press conferences, and other newsworthy events. Particularly in high profile trials, visual media act as a window to a courtroom that is often overflowing.”

“There are many states that do allow cameras in the court and it does not disrupt, or have a negative impact, on the proceedings. Photography is an essential element in a complete news report, whether for print or broadcast, and the NPPA will continue to support efforts to legalize cameras in the courtroom in New York as well as in other states where it’s currently banned."

The 53-year-old state law bars motion picture cameras from trial courtrooms but there is some question as to whether or not that language also precludes still photography. No verdicts in any of the approximately 800 trials the cable network has televised since 1991 have been reversed because of the presence of cameras, nor was there ever an appeal of any case on those grounds during New York’s 10-year experiment.

“The (New York) legislature did the right thing years ago by authorizing an experiment that lasted 10 years, and resulted in no problems at all,” attorney Kurt Wimmer said. “It ought to take the next step and let video cameras in permanently.” Wimmer is with the Washington, DC, law firm of Covington & Burling, which has provided pro bono counsel to the NPPA on many issues involving press freedom and First Amendment challenges, including the 2004 United States Supreme Court case Durruthy v. Pastor. Albert Durruthy, a Miami, FL, television photojournalist, sued a police officer for false arrest, assault, and excessive use of force after being brought down to the ground and injured, then arrested, while on assignment covering an Elián González protest in April, 2000.

Mickey Osterreicher contributed to this story.

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Donald K. Woolley, 73

Retired photojournalism professor, speaker, and newspaper columnist Donald Kenneth Woolley, 73, died June 14 in Nashville, TN, following a brief illness.

An NPPA Life Member, Woolley started as a photographer and editor for Octoraro Newspapers in Quarryville, PA, before becoming chief photographer and manager of the photojournalism department at the Columbia Daily Tribune in Columbia, MO. Later, Woolley was an assistant professor at the University of Iowa School of Journalism for ten years before being named an associate professor at the College of Journalism at the University of South Carolina, where he was head of the photojournalism sequence until he retired in 1995.

Joe Lippincott, a photojournalism instructor at Boston University and long-time friend of Woolley’s, wrote, “I thought Don would live forever. The knowledge, joy, and upbeat humor he shared with all of us should have earned him immortality.” Lippincott first met Woolley at the University of Iowa. “Many of those of us whose lives he touched at the very beginning at Iowa did pretty damn well, thank you... Bernie Ketchum, Bob Finch, Tom Mosier, Bob Nandell, to name only a few. And so many more followed.”

Lippincott says, “In my Boston University photojournalism classes for the past 15 years, I always have found a reason to tell stories about Don’s final exams. Once, dressed as Santa, Henry Louis (a Leica dealer) landed his Army-issue helicopter on the roof of the journalism building (to deliver the exams). Once, Don had his teaching assistant go to Davenport or some far away town and stash the final exams in cattle cars, which eventually found their way to Iowa City so the students could rummage around in the straw - and God knows what else - for them.

“My favorite, though, was the summer he had the Saran-wrapped exams frozen in a 400-pound block of ice in Cedar Rapids and had the ice shipped to Iowa City and dumped into the Iowa River, which ran through campus. His teaching assistant was dressed in a pirate costume in a rowboat with a Jolly Roger flag flying on the bow, towing the block of ice toward Don and the students waiting downriver. They all had been issued Woolley-approved ice picks, of course. But by the time the block of ice got in close proximity to the students, exams were bobbing freely everywhere in sight. The water was very warm and the ice was rapidly melting.

“In the late 1970s, I invited Don to be a speaker at the Michigan Press Photographers Association annual seminar in East Lansing. He made an unforgettable presentation about how to photograph presentations, complete with an all-purpose portable do-it-yourself trophy kit.”

Woolley was active in NPPA events, including being a Flying Short Course speaker and judging numerous state and national contests. He is survived by his wife, Deborah K. Woolley of Nashville. The family asks that memorials be made to the College of the Ozarks in Point Lookout, MO.

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Best Use of Photography: 1st Quarter 2005 Results For News, Feature, Picture Pages, Sports, Multi-Page

Judges for news, feature, picture pages: David Frank, Karen Cetinkaya, Becky Lebowitz Hanger, members of The New York Times photography department.

News

Judges’ overall comments
Once we pulled together what we thought were the top pages, we noticed that quite a few of them had very strong verticals used as the dominant (sometimes only) image on the page. Though not all the photos were especially strong, the shape of the photos made for different-looking pages and we all found that to be very striking. Another thing that struck us in this category was how busy the pages tended to look. The content and composition of the photos, the overuse of mugshots and other small photos and especially the multiple types of typography on many pages made for jarringly busy pages. We also noticed that lots of papers are using photography well, but the content of the photos is frequently lacking.
Results
[image of winning News page from the Hartford Courant]
1st
The Hartford Courant, Jan. 7, 2005
“A Rough Going Over”
David Grewe, Thom McGuire and John Scanlon
Judges' comments: This page was clean and elegant. The photo choice was interesting, newsy. Just a simple, strong, good-looking page.
2nd
Treasure Coast Newspapers, Feb. 15, 2005
“Former PM killed in Beirut blast”
Entered by Lloyd Young
Judges' comments: The photo usage here is counter-intuitive. The editor used the emotional reaction to the bombing dominant and the scene secondary. The unusual decision to play the photos that way made for an interesting page.
3rd
The Palm Beach Post, Mar. 13, 2005
“Why was Carlitos born this way?”
Team
Judges' comments: We liked the main package on this page a lot more than we liked the page as a whole. The main package was extremely strong – we couldn’t stop looking at that photo. It was a bold choice to run a difficult (perhaps even controversial) photo like that as the main page one photo.
HM
Anchorage Daily News, Mar. 2, 2005
“Two Snared in Dimond Center Shooting”
Anne Raup, Richard Murphy and Bill Roth
Judges' comments: What we liked about this page was that running the crime scene photo as the main display photo wasn’t necessarily what most people would do. It is the type of photo that could easily have gotten buried as a 2-column photo on the jump. But the photo editor had the vision to make it the display photo – and it works very well big and in color. It’s not a great photo, but it’s interesting and shows good thinking on the part of the editor.
HM
The Concord Monitor, Jan. 11, 2005
“Winter’s Claw”
Dan Habib and Terri Henning
Judges' comments: This was one of the pages that we liked because of the use of a strong vertical shape. The page just looked different from most of the other pages.
HM
The Palm Beach Post, Jan. 19, 2005
“Lofty Subject”
Mark Edelson, Chris Matula, Bill Bullion and Jennifer Podis
Judges' comments: This was another one of those vertical photo pages.
HM
San Antonio Express-News, Feb. 15, 2005
“Car bomb rocks Lebanon”
Entered by Doug Sehres
Judges' comments: Good photo choice. It’s nice to see it used big and by itself. But there are too many little elements on this page – they’re starting to take over the page.

Feature

Judges’ overall comments:

We all gravitated immediately to the top two finishers in this category. We were unanimous in thinking they were the two strongest pages, mainly because they’re beautifully done.

Results
[image of winning Feature page from the Hartford Courant]
1st
The Hartford Courant, Feb. 24, 2005
“Cool as Ice”
Elizabeth Bristow, Tim Reck and Mark Mirko
Judges' comments: Great illustration – the outdoors, the snow, the trees, the colors, the selective use of focus. It’s a beautifully executed, clean photo. . Both the photo and the page are compositionally strong. The entire page is very elegant
2nd
Columbia Daily Tribune, Jan. 23, 2005
“Life Resumed”
Brian Kratzer, Joe Shults, Sharon Santus and Jim Robertson
Judges' comments: The main photo is very strong and, played well, it makes for an arresting page. Nice, clean presentation. Everything on this page is just working well together. This paper had some very strong entries in this category.
3rd
The Florida Times Union, Jan. 10, 2005
“Century of Advice”
Kelly Jordan, Jon Fletcher and Ed Geffen
Judges' comments: The main package on this page is very strong. Wonderful choice of dominant image. The column on the left is a little distracting and made the page a bit weaker.
HM
Columbia Daily Tribune, Jan. 23, 2005
“The Last Sermon”
Brian Kratzer, Lori Curtain, Sharon Santus and Jim Robertson
Judges' comments: This was a beautiful, simple page. The photos are great – especially the dominant image. The smaller photo of the two people (just below the main photo), however, took away from the package. It seemed too similar visually to the main photo. It felt repetitive. Without it, it would have been a stronger page.
HM
The Hartford Courant, Mar. 18, 2005
“Protecting your personal identity”
Elizabeth Bristow, Jennifer Rochette and Stephen Dunn
Judges' comments: This illustration is just a great concept and so well executed. It’s very clever.
HM
The Hartford Courant, Feb. 6, 2005
“In Paris, We Kiss”
Bruce Moyer, Sherry Peters and Melanie Shaffer
Judges' comments: This is simply a beautiful page – but we wondered why it wasn’t entered in the picture page category.

Picture Page

Judges’ overall comments

It seemed like there was either too much or not enough on these pages; they tended toward extremes. We saw many picture pages that needed tighter editing – just too many pictures on the page to allow anything to have any real impact. We didn’t see much moderation. As with the feature page category, the first and second place pages were by far the strongest entries.

Results
[image of winning Picture page from the Albuquerque Tribune]
1st
The Albuquerque Tribune, Jan. 18, 2005
“Dealing with Death”
MaryAnn McBride, Mark Holm and A.P. photos
Judges' comments: This was a beautiful page – well designed and with gorgeous, sad photographs. We were all drawn to it. It’s graceful and elegant. Whether you like the photos or not, the page draws you in.
2nd
The Palm Beach Post, Mar. 10, 2005
“Fair hosts first rodeo”
Mark Edelson and Libby Volgyes
Judges' comments: The subject matter here is run-of-the-mill, but the main picture is different – a beautiful shot. It’s a daring choice to run as the dominant image. The page is strong and well-designed. It’s a traditional topic done in a non-traditional way – there’s nothing here (maybe with the exception of the bottom photo) that you usually see in the usual photo coverage of rodeos.
3rd
The San Jose Mercury News, Jan. 16, 2005
“The Aftermath: Sorrow, Survival”
Pauline Lubens, Geri Migielicz, Caroline E. Couig, Mark Damon, Michael Malone, Akili-Casundria Ramsess and Jami C. Smith
Judges' comments: Great presentation. The small photos at the top work very well and it’s nice to see the main photo played so large – it gives the reader a chance to really look around at what’s going on in the frame. But something on this page seemed off. We wondered if a different crop of either the main photo or the bottom photo (do we need to see the mountains in the distance twice?) might have improved the page.
HM
The Palm Beach Post, Feb. 6, 2005
“It’s the little things you remember. And that you’re remembered by.”
Mark Edelson and Uma Sanghvi
Judges' comments: We really liked the extremely different take on a story that (at this point) had already been page one news for more than a month. It was a different way to cover a familiar story. We wondered if the page would have worked better with fewer pictures. It seems to fall off a bit at the bottom. The photos at the top are more lyrical and better lit than the ones at the bottom. We also wondered if the top photo was the right choice to be in such a prominent position. It felt like a sign picture. One judge longed for more context or an image of a different scale and thought the uniformity of the page and the inanimate objects made it look almost clinical – though perhaps better lighting and more uniformly lyrical shooting would have achieved that.
HM
The San Jose Mercury News, Feb. 13, 2005
“Love or Something Like It”
Richard Koci Hernandez, Geri Migielicz, Caroline E. Couig, Mark Damon, Michael Malone, Akili-Casundria Ramsess and Jami C. Smith
Judges' comments: The main photo on this page is beautiful, but the bottom right photo is too difficult to read – it causes the page to fall apart at the bottom. We loved looking at this page, but found ourselves wanting more.
HM
The Hartford Courant, Feb. 14, 2005
“The Young and The Wrestling”
Bruce Moyer, Mark Mirko and Suzette Moyer
Judges' comments: The main photo here is very strong and the layout is clean and appealing. But the bottom two photos were far less interesting than the rest of the page.
HM
The Palm Beach Post, Feb. 3, 2005
“This was hell on earth.”
Mark Edelson and Associated Press photos
Judges' comments: This was a nice, well designed page. It’s just clean, well-done design and photo choice that makes for an attractive, newsy picture page.

Sports and Multi-Page

Judges for multi-page and sports: Tory Bruno, assistant managing editor of photography, The Chicago Tribune, along with sports editor Bill Adee, assistant sports editor Mike Kellams, assistant director of photography Todd Panagopoulos, assistant graphics editor Haeyoun Park, assistant design editor Mike Miner, and staff photographer Scott Strazzante, who judged the pages on May 9 at The Chicago Tribune.

Sports

[image of winning Sports page from the Indianapolis Star]

1st
Indianapolis Star, Jan. 17, 2005
Out-Foxed Again: Colts playoffs
Entered by Greg Griffo
Judges' comments: Beautiful marriage of words and photo. Bold headline played well with the telling image of Colts’ loss. Not over-designed.
2nd
San Antonio Express-News, Feb. 11, 2005
Doubling Down
Doug Sehres and William Luther
Judges' comments: Great use of portraiture. We’ve seen this idea executed poorly so it was refreshing to see it done right.
3rd
The Virginian-Pilot, Mar. 27, 2005
It ain't over 'til... - NCAA March Madness
Team
Judges' comments: Being from Chicago, we’ve seen almost every image to come out of this game and the one chosen here was by far the best. Designer let the image carry the page.
HM
The Palm Beach Post, Feb. 7, 2005
Three of a Kind - Super Bowl Extra
Mark Simkins, Amy Sancetta, Mark Edelson and Chris Rukan
Judges' comments: Huge photo with minimal intrusion by words and graphics
HM
Anchorage Daily News, Feb. 7, 2005
Boston Three Party
Anne Raup and Richard Murphy
Judges' comments: High impact photo of David Givens by Amy Sancetta made this page.
HM
Minneapolis Star Tribune, Mar. 11, 2005
Sports Weekend
Derek Simmons, Jeff Wheeler and Deb Pastner
Judges' comments:This page was made by a wonderful jubilation shot from above by Jeff Wheeler. Editors and designers made it happen on deadline.

Multiple Page

[image of winning Multiple Page entry page from the Palm Beach Post]

1st
The Palm Beach Post, Jan. 9, 2005
Tsunami (5 pages)
Mark Edelson, Lauren Perry, Jan Tuckwood and Lou Ann Frala
Judges' comments: Very wide-ranging coverage of a huge story but done with an economy of images. Huge horizontal of dry ice and deep vertical of destruction were very deserving of their size. The page of detail photos pushed this entry above the 2nd place entry. The graphic was informative but a bit incongruous with the rest of the section.
2nd
Los Angeles Times, Feb. 28, 2005
The Oscars (7 pages)
Kirk McCoy, Calvin Hom, Cindy Hively, Hal Wells, Richard Derk, Iris Schneider, Robert St. John and Allan Hagman
Judges' comments: Borrowing a headline from this section, this package was “Simply Elegant”. Georgeous design and an impressive commitment of space carried this entry.
3rd
The Hartford Courant, Jan. 16, 2005
New Haven is Hot (8 pages)
Bruce Moyer, Mark Mirko and Melanie Shaffer
Judges' comments: Wonderful design and continuity of images. A more sophisticated execution of the head shots might have elevated the impact of this entry.
HM
The Commercial Appeal, Mar. 6, 13 and 20, 2005
Born To Die (24 pages)
John Sale, John Nelson and Karen Pulfer Focht
Judges' comments: Great commitment to space, but quality of images in days 1 and 2 weakened the impact of the series.
HM
Los Angeles Times, Mar. 10, 2005
The California Garden- A diva who loved high drama (2 pages)
Kirk McCoy, Iris Schneider and Kelli Sullivan
Judges' comments: Combination of words and pictures created the perfect mood for this effort.

2nd quarter BUP results

Comments? Corrections? More information? Next quarter's deadline? Contact BUP contest chair Mark Edelson at [email protected]

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Best Use of Photography: 1st Quarter 2005 Results For News, Feature, Picture Pages, Sports, Multi-Page

Judges for news, feature, picture pages: David Frank, Karen Cetinkaya, Becky Lebowitz Hanger, members of The New York Times photography department.

News

Judges’ overall comments
Once we pulled together what we thought were the top pages, we noticed that quite a few of them had very strong verticals used as the dominant (sometimes only) image on the page. Though not all the photos were especially strong, the shape of the photos made for different-looking pages and we all found that to be very striking. Another thing that struck us in this category was how busy the pages tended to look. The content and composition of the photos, the overuse of mugshots and other small photos and especially the multiple types of typography on many pages made for jarringly busy pages. We also noticed that lots of papers are using photography well, but the content of the photos is frequently lacking.
Results
[image of winning News page from the Hartford Courant]
1st
The Hartford Courant, Jan. 7, 2005
“A Rough Going Over”
David Grewe, Thom McGuire and John Scanlon
Judges' comments: This page was clean and elegant. The photo choice was interesting, newsy. Just a simple, strong, good-looking page.
2nd
Treasure Coast Newspapers, Feb. 15, 2005
“Former PM killed in Beirut blast”
Entered by Lloyd Young
Judges' comments: The photo usage here is counter-intuitive. The editor used the emotional reaction to the bombing dominant and the scene secondary. The unusual decision to play the photos that way made for an interesting page.
3rd
The Palm Beach Post, Mar. 13, 2005
“Why was Carlitos born this way?”
Team
Judges' comments: We liked the main package on this page a lot more than we liked the page as a whole. The main package was extremely strong – we couldn’t stop looking at that photo. It was a bold choice to run a difficult (perhaps even controversial) photo like that as the main page one photo.
HM
Anchorage Daily News, Mar. 2, 2005
“Two Snared in Dimond Center Shooting”
Anne Raup, Richard Murphy and Bill Roth
Judges' comments: What we liked about this page was that running the crime scene photo as the main display photo wasn’t necessarily what most people would do. It is the type of photo that could easily have gotten buried as a 2-column photo on the jump. But the photo editor had the vision to make it the display photo – and it works very well big and in color. It’s not a great photo, but it’s interesting and shows good thinking on the part of the editor.
HM
The Concord Monitor, Jan. 11, 2005
“Winter’s Claw”
Dan Habib and Terri Henning
Judges' comments: This was one of the pages that we liked because of the use of a strong vertical shape. The page just looked different from most of the other pages.
HM
The Palm Beach Post, Jan. 19, 2005
“Lofty Subject”
Mark Edelson, Chris Matula, Bill Bullion and Jennifer Podis
Judges' comments: This was another one of those vertical photo pages.
HM
San Antonio Express-News, Feb. 15, 2005
“Car bomb rocks Lebanon”
Entered by Doug Sehres
Judges' comments: Good photo choice. It’s nice to see it used big and by itself. But there are too many little elements on this page – they’re starting to take over the page.

 

Feature

Judges’ overall comments:

We all gravitated immediately to the top two finishers in this category. We were unanimous in thinking they were the two strongest pages, mainly because they’re beautifully done.

Results
[image of winning Feature page from the Hartford Courant]
1st
The Hartford Courant, Feb. 24, 2005
“Cool as Ice”
Elizabeth Bristow, Tim Reck and Mark Mirko
Judges' comments: Great illustration – the outdoors, the snow, the trees, the colors, the selective use of focus. It’s a beautifully executed, clean photo. . Both the photo and the page are compositionally strong. The entire page is very elegant
2nd
Columbia Daily Tribune, Jan. 23, 2005
“Life Resumed”
Brian Kratzer, Joe Shults, Sharon Santus and Jim Robertson
Judges' comments: The main photo is very strong and, played well, it makes for an arresting page. Nice, clean presentation. Everything on this page is just working well together. This paper had some very strong entries in this category.
3rd
The Florida Times Union, Jan. 10, 2005
“Century of Advice”
Kelly Jordan, Jon Fletcher and Ed Geffen
Judges' comments: The main package on this page is very strong. Wonderful choice of dominant image. The column on the left is a little distracting and made the page a bit weaker.
HM
Columbia Daily Tribune, Jan. 23, 2005
“The Last Sermon”
Brian Kratzer, Lori Curtain, Sharon Santus and Jim Robertson
Judges' comments: This was a beautiful, simple page. The photos are great – especially the dominant image. The smaller photo of the two people (just below the main photo), however, took away from the package. It seemed too similar visually to the main photo. It felt repetitive. Without it, it would have been a stronger page.
HM
The Hartford Courant, Mar. 18, 2005
“Protecting your personal identity”
Elizabeth Bristow, Jennifer Rochette and Stephen Dunn
Judges' comments: This illustration is just a great concept and so well executed. It’s very clever.
HM
The Hartford Courant, Feb. 6, 2005
“In Paris, We Kiss”
Bruce Moyer, Sherry Peters and Melanie Shaffer
Judges' comments: This is simply a beautiful page – but we wondered why it wasn’t entered in the picture page category.

 

Picture Page

Judges’ overall comments

It seemed like there was either too much or not enough on these pages; they tended toward extremes. We saw many picture pages that needed tighter editing – just too many pictures on the page to allow anything to have any real impact. We didn’t see much moderation. As with the feature page category, the first and second place pages were by far the strongest entries.

Results
[image of winning Picture page from the Albuquerque Tribune]
1st
The Albuquerque Tribune, Jan. 18, 2005
“Dealing with Death”
MaryAnn McBride, Mark Holm and A.P. photos
Judges' comments: This was a beautiful page – well designed and with gorgeous, sad photographs. We were all drawn to it. It’s graceful and elegant. Whether you like the photos or not, the page draws you in.
2nd
The Palm Beach Post, Mar. 10, 2005
“Fair hosts first rodeo”
Mark Edelson and Libby Volgyes
Judges' comments: The subject matter here is run-of-the-mill, but the main picture is different – a beautiful shot. It’s a daring choice to run as the dominant image. The page is strong and well-designed. It’s a traditional topic done in a non-traditional way – there’s nothing here (maybe with the exception of the bottom photo) that you usually see in the usual photo coverage of rodeos.
3rd
The San Jose Mercury News, Jan. 16, 2005
“The Aftermath: Sorrow, Survival”
Pauline Lubens, Geri Migielicz, Caroline E. Couig, Mark Damon, Michael Malone, Akili-Casundria Ramsess and Jami C. Smith
Judges' comments: Great presentation. The small photos at the top work very well and it’s nice to see the main photo played so large – it gives the reader a chance to really look around at what’s going on in the frame. But something on this page seemed off. We wondered if a different crop of either the main photo or the bottom photo (do we need to see the mountains in the distance twice?) might have improved the page.
HM
The Palm Beach Post, Feb. 6, 2005
“It’s the little things you remember. And that you’re remembered by.”
Mark Edelson and Uma Sanghvi
Judges' comments: We really liked the extremely different take on a story that (at this point) had already been page one news for more than a month. It was a different way to cover a familiar story. We wondered if the page would have worked better with fewer pictures. It seems to fall off a bit at the bottom. The photos at the top are more lyrical and better lit than the ones at the bottom. We also wondered if the top photo was the right choice to be in such a prominent position. It felt like a sign picture. One judge longed for more context or an image of a different scale and thought the uniformity of the page and the inanimate objects made it look almost clinical – though perhaps better lighting and more uniformly lyrical shooting would have achieved that.
HM
The San Jose Mercury News, Feb. 13, 2005
“Love or Something Like It”
Richard Koci Hernandez, Geri Migielicz, Caroline E. Couig, Mark Damon, Michael Malone, Akili-Casundria Ramsess and Jami C. Smith
Judges' comments: The main photo on this page is beautiful, but the bottom right photo is too difficult to read – it causes the page to fall apart at the bottom. We loved looking at this page, but found ourselves wanting more.
HM
The Hartford Courant, Feb. 14, 2005
“The Young and The Wrestling”
Bruce Moyer, Mark Mirko and Suzette Moyer
Judges' comments: The main photo here is very strong and the layout is clean and appealing. But the bottom two photos were far less interesting than the rest of the page.
HM
The Palm Beach Post, Feb. 3, 2005
“This was hell on earth.”
Mark Edelson and Associated Press photos
Judges' comments: This was a nice, well designed page. It’s just clean, well-done design and photo choice that makes for an attractive, newsy picture page.

 

Sports and Multi-Page

Judges for multi-page and sports: Tory Bruno, assistant managing editor of photography, The Chicago Tribune, along with sports editor Bill Adee, assistant sports editor Mike Kellams, assistant director of photography Todd Panagopoulos, assistant graphics editor Haeyoun Park, assistant design editor Mike Miner, and staff photographer Scott Strazzante, who judged the pages on May 9 at The Chicago Tribune.

 

Sports

[image of winning Sports page from the Indianapolis Star]

1st
Indianapolis Star, Jan. 17, 2005
Out-Foxed Again: Colts playoffs
Entered by Greg Griffo
Judges' comments: Beautiful marriage of words and photo. Bold headline played well with the telling image of Colts’ loss. Not over-designed.
2nd
San Antonio Express-News, Feb. 11, 2005
Doubling Down
Doug Sehres and William Luther
Judges' comments: Great use of portraiture. We’ve seen this idea executed poorly so it was refreshing to see it done right.
3rd
The Virginian-Pilot, Mar. 27, 2005
It ain't over 'til... - NCAA March Madness
Team
Judges' comments: Being from Chicago, we’ve seen almost every image to come out of this game and the one chosen here was by far the best. Designer let the image carry the page.
HM
The Palm Beach Post, Feb. 7, 2005
Three of a Kind - Super Bowl Extra
Mark Simkins, Amy Sancetta, Mark Edelson and Chris Rukan
Judges' comments: Huge photo with minimal intrusion by words and graphics
HM
Anchorage Daily News, Feb. 7, 2005
Boston Three Party
Anne Raup and Richard Murphy
Judges' comments: High impact photo of David Givens by Amy Sancetta made this page.
HM
Minneapolis Star Tribune, Mar. 11, 2005
Sports Weekend
Derek Simmons, Jeff Wheeler and Deb Pastner
Judges' comments:This page was made by a wonderful jubilation shot from above by Jeff Wheeler. Editors and designers made it happen on deadline.

 

Multiple Page

[image of winning Multiple Page entry page from the Palm Beach Post]

1st
The Palm Beach Post, Jan. 9, 2005
Tsunami (5 pages)
Mark Edelson, Lauren Perry, Jan Tuckwood and Lou Ann Frala
Judges' comments: Very wide-ranging coverage of a huge story but done with an economy of images. Huge horizontal of dry ice and deep vertical of destruction were very deserving of their size. The page of detail photos pushed this entry above the 2nd place entry. The graphic was informative but a bit incongruous with the rest of the section.
2nd
Los Angeles Times, Feb. 28, 2005
The Oscars (7 pages)
Kirk McCoy, Calvin Hom, Cindy Hively, Hal Wells, Richard Derk, Iris Schneider, Robert St. John and Allan Hagman
Judges' comments: Borrowing a headline from this section, this package was “Simply Elegant”. Georgeous design and an impressive commitment of space carried this entry.
3rd
The Hartford Courant, Jan. 16, 2005
New Haven is Hot (8 pages)
Bruce Moyer, Mark Mirko and Melanie Shaffer
Judges' comments: Wonderful design and continuity of images. A more sophisticated execution of the head shots might have elevated the impact of this entry.
HM
The Commercial Appeal, Mar. 6, 13 and 20, 2005
Born To Die (24 pages)
John Sale, John Nelson and Karen Pulfer Focht
Judges' comments: Great commitment to space, but quality of images in days 1 and 2 weakened the impact of the series.
HM
Los Angeles Times, Mar. 10, 2005
The California Garden- A diva who loved high drama (2 pages)
Kirk McCoy, Iris Schneider and Kelli Sullivan
Judges' comments: Combination of words and pictures created the perfect mood for this effort.

2nd quarter BUP results

Comments? Corrections? More information? Next quarter's deadline? Contact BUP contest chair Mark Edelson at [email protected]

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Deadline For 2005 W. Eugene Smith Grant Is July 15

Photojournalists have until July 15, 2005, to apply for the 26th annual W. Eugene Smith Grant from the W. Eugene Smith Memorial Fund, Inc., funded by Nikon Inc., as well as applying for the Howard Chapnick Grant for the Advancement of Photojournalism.

The W. Eugene Smith Grant in Humanistic Photography is presented each year, the application says, “to a photographer whose past work and proposed project, as judged by a panel of experts, follows the tradition of W. Eugene Smith's compassionate dedication exhibited during his 45-year career as a photographic essayist.”

This year the grant will be $30,000 USD with an additional $5,000 USD in fellowship money “to be awarded at the discretion of the jury.”

July 15 is also the deadline to apply for the Howard Chapnick Grant, which is also administered by the W. Eugene Smith Memorial Fund. The Chapnick Grant was introduced in 1996 by the Smith Fund “to encourage and support leadership in fields ancillary to photojournalism.” These fields include editing, research, education, and management and the grant of $5,000 USD can be used to finance education, research, or long-term projects, and the Smith Fund board of trustees says that special consideration will be given to proposals that “promote social change or serve significant concerns of photojournalism.”

Complete instructions on how to apply, including downloadable Acrobat .PDF forms for both grants, are online at www.smithfund.org.

Stanley Greene was the 2004 recipient of the W. Eugene Smith Grant for Humanistic Photography for his project, “Chalk Lines: A Photographic Investigation of the Caucasus.” Other past winners include Trent Parke (2003); Kai Wiedenhofer (2002); Maya Goded (2001); Brenda Ann Kenneally (2000); and Chien-Chi Chang (1999).

The board of trustees who administer the two grants are Helen Marcus, president; Robert Pledge, vice president; Sue Brisk, secretary; and Jeanette Chapnick, treasurer. Board members include Jim Balog, Rich Clarkson, Donna Ferrato, Peter Howe, Jim Hughes, W. M. Hunt, Chris Johns, Yukiko Launois, John G. Morris, Kathy Ryan, Marcel Saba, Mike Smith, Arthur Soybel, and Anna Winand.

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ASMP Foundation Extends Grant Application Deadline

PHILADELPHIA, PA -- The American Society of Media Photographers Foundation has extended its spring deadline for grant applications until June 15, ASMP director of communications Peter Dyson announced. “If you have a project that fits the Foundation's guidelines, you are invited to submit a proposal. The guidelines, along with application forms and descriptions of past awards, are posted online,” Dyson wrote. The information is online at www.asmp.org/foundation/

Dyson said, “The ASMP Foundation's mission is to support the education of ASMP members and the creative community to which they belong. Its goal is to encourage the professional and artistic growth of photographers. Although the Foundation cannot usually offer total funding for any given program, its grants of up to $1,500 can, in conjunction with other funding sources, be instrumental in promoting worthy projects.” Examples of winning grants are on the Web page including Spring 2005's winners and last year's grant recipients.

The ASMP Foundation Grants Committee evaluates applications two times each year. Applicants will be notified within 60 days if their application has been accepted or rejected. ASMP says that all grant decisions are made on a nondiscriminatory basis. For more information contact ASMP’s executive director Eugene Mopsik at +1.215.451.2767 or eMail him at [email protected]asmp.org.

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Proposed NYC Subway Photo Ban Is Dead; Photo Ban In Hempstead, Long Island, Is Rescinded

A New York City Transit proposal last year to make a rule change that would prohibit photography and videotaping in subways and bus systems, which was strongly opposed by the NPPA and many other photography, press, civil rights, and free speech groups, is now dead, and a 12-year-old ban on photography on public beaches and parks in the Town of Hempstead, Long Island, has been overturned.

After a long period of public comment, the Metropolitan Transit Authority did not vote on the measure to ban photography on New York City buses and in the subways. An upcoming hearing on the proposal was scheduled, but now that the measure has been dropped the hearing is moot.

“In the wake of the public comments period, after consulting with the New York Police Department, which had originally requested the rule change, MTA NYC Transit will not go forward with the institution of a photo ban,” Transit Authority spokesperson Charles Seaton told The New York Daily News on May 22. In the same story The News also quotes NYPD deputy commissioner Paul Browne who says, “We are not pressing for a ban. Our officers will continue to investigate, and intercede if necessary, if the activity – photo-related or not – is suspicious.”

“This is truly a victory for photojournalism, and we must continue our efforts on issues like these to protect our freedoms and First Amendment rights,” NPPA president Bob Gould said in response to the news. “Thanks to Todd Maisel and everyone else who worked to oppose this proposal for their persistence in this matter.”

Last summer, NPPA member photojournalists took part in a protest in the subway by shooting photographs of each other alongside members of the New York Public Interest Group and The Straphangers Campaign inside one of the subway stations. NPPA’s Region 2, which includes New York City and is led by director Harry Diorio and associate director Maisel, had planned to hold a press conference with other organizations who opposed the photography ban in front of the MTA headquarters before any vote could be taken, but that’s no longer necessary now.

“We want to thank Kurt Wimmer and Amy Levine of the law firm Covington and Burling for the enormous amount of work that they did on our behalf,” said NPPA vice president and chairperson of the organization’s Advocacy Committee Alicia Wagner Calzada. “They filed an extensive legal brief to the MTA on behalf of the NPPA, which clearly laid out all of our legal arguments for why the ban was unconstitutional.”

“NPPA pursued this proposed subway ban from many angles with public statements, legal comments, a call to members to submit their own comments, a public protest, news articles, cooperative efforts with other groups, and plans to be there in person for the vote,” Calzada wrote to the Board. “It may seem like a lot of effort for one city, but we really believed that this case would be looked at throughout the nation and that other cities would follow the lead of what happened in New York City.”

Maisel wrote, “Also coming to our aid was the New York Press Photographers Association, the National Press Club, the New York Civil Liberties Union, ASMP and PPA. We also thank the many camera clubs throughout New York State who pledged their support and sent letters to the MTA condemning the ban. We thank the thousands of opponents of the ban for signing our petitions, sending letters, and commenting during the MTA 90-day public comment period that was dubiously launched during the holidays to minimize reaction. The MTA, however, found that despite the holidays, they received thousands of angry comments against the ban. It also resulted in Mayor Mike Bloomberg condemning the proposal and the New York City Police Department disavowing the plan.”

“NPPA Region 2 director Diorio said this victory will help in efforts against other censorship proposals,” Maisel told the NPPA Board of Directors, “including one that has already been started in the Town of Hempstead Long Island, NY, where officials there, despite not having a law, had banned photography in public parks and on beaches.”

Maisel reported to the Board, "After taking blistering criticism from the NPPA, the Town of Hempstead rescinded a ban on photography at their public beaches and parks that had been made policy by their Parks Department more than 12 years ago. Hepstead Town Supervisor Kate Murry acted quickly to correct the unconstitutional policy that was originally created because some residents were concerned about unauthorized photography of their children. Town officials now realize the ban was not supportable by law, and they could not make a ban on photography in public places where there is no reasonable expectation of privacy."

The story of Hempstead's ban came to light last week, Maisel said, when Joseph Senzatimore, 59, of Bellmore, NY, a member of the Wantagh Camera Club in Long Island, was taking his Nikon and tripod out of his car at Lido Beach, a public park, when he was stopped by park employees. He was told photography on the beach was illegal and could end in arrest. Maisel said Senzatimore contacted attorney Bill Balletti, a long-time friend of photographers in the city, which "set off a flurry of calls to NPPA." New York Daily News reporter Richard Weir did a story about Senzatimore and the photography ban, and "the ball was in motion," Maisel said.

Region 2's leaders and photographers started calling Hempstead authorites requesting written copies of the law and demanding the rule be rescinded. Soon Murray ordered the Parks Department to rescind the ban, giving photographers complete access to public areas.

"NPPA thanks the New York Daily News for putting a story together that brought the illegal ban to the public's attention," Maisel wrote to the Board, "and thanks Region 2 and NPPA vice president Alicia Wagner Calzado for her research that revealed there was no law in Hempstead codes to back up the ban."

Related story

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DeVigal And Judging Panel Launch New Online Multimedia Critique Of 2005 BOP Web Winners

AUSTIN, TX -- Andrew DeVigal, one of the five judges of the 2005 Best Of Photojournalism Best Of The Web contest, has created an important educational resource drawn from the contest judging and the entries. Recorded audio comments from the judges, synchronized with images from dozens of Web sites that they are reviewing, have been compiled into an interactive online presentation that can be seen here.

DeVigal, with the help of the other judges, spent many hours building this presentation and it’s an outstanding resource that starts with an overview and audio comments from the panel of judges, then expands into an examination of new media documentary work, how audio is used in multimedia, design templates that have become more sophisticated on the Web, image use and image counts, their favorite sites, and how Web new media applies to education. There’s also a section they call “surprises.”

Viewers can watch the presentation online or download the full audio podcast, and there are links to the Web editing winners that the judges discuss.

In addition to DeVigal, the founder of DeVigal Design who also teaches at San Francisco State University, the panel of Web judges included Dan Habib of The Concord Monitor;Shawn Greene, multimedia projects editor for The Miami Herald; Keith Jenkins, who is now the new photography editor for The Washington Post; and Maria Bunai, picture editor for Time.com.

Comments, feedback, and appreciations can be directed to DeVigal at [email protected].

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Photojournalist Bradley Clift Released From Sudan, Tells Story Of Ordeal, Refugees, In Hartford Courant

The Hartford Courant's photojournalist Bradley E. Clift was released by Sudanese government authorities last week after being held under house arrest near Nyala in Darfur since April 26, and he made his way to the Sudanese capital of Khartoum and then flew home to the States. The story of Clift's ordeal and what the photojournalist saw in the refugee camps has been written by Courant reporter Rinker Buck and published in the newspaper.

"Close-Up Of A Humanitarian Crisis" tells how the Sudanese government has gone to great lengths to keep the world from seeing the condition of up to as many as 2 million people who have been displaced and terrorized by the government-supported militia in Darfur, and it documents Clift's first-person account of being arrested while documenting the efforts of international relief workers to help refugees.

Clift, 47, was arrested by Sudanese security forces was being held while waiting for a hearing on charges that he was taking pictures in Darfur without the proper travel and photography permits, the Courant reported last week .

Authorities apparently decided not to formally charge Clift and he was released Tuesday May 10, and his passport and photography equipment was returned to him before he left for Khartoum. Two weeks ago Clift told State Department officials that he traveled to Darful legally under the auspices of the Sudanese Bishops' Conference to photograph relief workers assisting refugees. After Clift was arrested, theCourant also had reported that Clift traveled to Africa to meet up with a relief group from the Hartford Catholic Worker, a ministry that was distributing food at refugee camps in Western Darfur, near the town of Nyala.

An NPPA member since 1978, Clift was working as a freelance photojournalist documenting the plight of the refugees in Sudan when he was detained and placed under house arrest by Sudanese security forces in Darfur. The Courant's assistant managing editor for photography and graphics, Thom McGuire, said after Clift was detained that the photojournalist had traveled to Darfur as a freelancer after the newspaper considered, and then decided against, an assignment in the region that’s been brutalized by civil war for more than two years.

Clift was a nominated finalist for the Pulitzer Prize for Feature photography in 2003 for “Heroin Town,” a dramatic photographic essay that helped produce positive change by spotlighting heroin addiction in a Connecticut city . In 1987, he won an honorable mention in the Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Awards program for a Courant series called "Stevie's World of Pride." Clift has won many national and international photography awards, and is known for traveling to international hot spots and documenting the plights of war victims and refugees.

 
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